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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

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Living in Paradise: Hawaii Ranks Highest for Well-Being

February 2, 2016 1:33 am

Hawaii was once again named the state with the highest level of well-being in the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index®, a definitive measure and empiric database of real-time changes in well-being throughout the world. The Index examines perceptions related to financial security, relationship to the community, sense of purpose and social relationships, all of which directly influence quality of life, healthcare costs and workplace productivity.

Not surprisingly, Hawaii has ranked in the top 10 each year of the Index. Second to Hawaii in this year’s rankings was Alaska, followed by Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, Utah, Arizona and California.

Alabama and Florida have also experienced positive shifts in well-being, with Alabama seeing a significant rise to the 28th state and Florida moving to 12th.

“We are seeing many significant positive developments in well-being nationally, including a decline in the uninsured rate, a decline in smoking and an uptick in financial well-being, but there is still much to be done on the national front and at the state and organizational level,” explains Dan Witters, principal and research director of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. “One specific area of concern continues to be the obesity rate, which continued its relentless upward climb in 2015 and reached another new high, breaking the 28 percent barrier for the first time.”

In the U.S., higher well-being has been shown to correlate with lower healthcare costs and increased worker productivity, in turn enhancing organizational and community competitiveness.

Globally, higher well-being has been associated with outcomes indicative of stability and resilience—for example, intent to migrate, trust in elections and local institutions, daily stress, food and shelter security, volunteerism and willingness to help others.

Sources: Gallup, Healthways

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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10 Houseplants That Can Actually Improve Your Health

February 1, 2016 1:33 am

Adding a houseplant or two always seems to improve the look of a room. But as it turns out, certain houseplants can also improve your health. According to recent studies by NASA, some houseplants filter out dangerous compounds that are commonly found in most homes – the kind of compounds that are often associated with respiratory illnesses, cancer, and other conditions.

Because they are enclosed spaces, our homes are vulnerable to gaseous toxins that build up over time. These include:

Benzene – caused by paints, detergents, and furniture wax,
Formaldehyde – caused by disinfectants or preservatives in consumer products
Toluene and Xylene – caused by a variety of household and consumer products
Ammonia – caused by commonly used aerosols and sprays

But 10 NASA-approved houseplants are said to be effective in removing air pollutants:

English Ivy – A trailing ivy plant that requires partial shade and light weekly watering

Florist’s Chrysanthemum – A lovely floral that needs direct light and frequent change of water

Peace Lily – Produces small, white flowers. Needs weekly watering. But consider carefully before buying, because this plant can be poisonous to house pets

Variegated Snake Plant – Has tall, broad, green and white leaves. Requires partial shade and weekly watering

Red-Edged Dracaena – Almost cactus-like in appearance, this plant needs direct sunlight and weekly watering

Cornstalk Dracaena – Produces cornstalk-type leaves. Wants partial shade and weekly watering

Broadleaf Lady Palm – Fern-like plant that likes partial shade and weekly watering

Flamingo Lily – Also known as anthurium, this plant produces shiny red flowers and requires partial shade and weekly watering

Devil’s Ivy – Produces luxurious ivy leaves, likes partial shade, and needs only monthly watering

Lilyturf – Produces purple flowers. Requires partial shade and weekly watering.

*Take note: Water lightly in most cases, as over-watering can cause root rot and kill the plant.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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