RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Improve Your Credit Score

April 12, 2017 12:57 am

Many Americans hope to improve their credit score. Whether you’re planning on applying for a mortgage or a loan in the future, or just want to do your financial due diligence, the experts at Experian offer the following tips for improve your credit score.  

Review your credit report regularly — Your personal credit report is an easy-to-read record of your credit accounts and total indebtedness. Be sure to obtain a copy of your credit report once every 12 months (and especially before major purchases) and dispute any information you believe is inaccurate. You can request a copy of your report directly from Experian or once every year from Annual Credit Report.

Check your credit score — Credit scores can play an important role in your financial journey. They translate the information in your credit report into a number reflecting the risk of doing business with you. To check your risk, request a credit score when you order your credit report. You will receive an explanation of what the score means and which details from your credit report are most affecting it.

Keep your utilization rate low — Your utilization rate, or balance-to-limit ratio, should never exceed 30 percent of the credit limit. Your total credit card balances should never be more than 30 percent of your total credit card limits, and you don't want any one card to have a balance of more than 30 percent of its limit. Both can hurt you. Remember, 30 percent isn't a goal; it's the maximum your balances should ever be. The lower your utilization rate, the better.

If you have missed payments, get current and stay current — Late payments, called delinquencies, may have a major negative impact on credit scores. To see the fastest improvement in your scores, catch up on late payments and pay down your balances. Late payments are the most important indicator of credit risk, so they have the greatest and longest-lasting impact. The more recently the missed payment occurred, the greater that impact will be, and the more missed payments you have, the longer it will take to recover. If you fall behind on your payments, contact your lenders to see if they can improve the terms of your debts.

Source: Experian

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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To Your Health: Time to De-screen

April 11, 2017 12:54 am

We wake up in the morning and reach for our smartphone. Then we open up our laptop to check email. Then we get to the office and hunker down at our desktop computer for hours on end. Then we come home and watch TV. Before we turn out the lights, we read a few pages of our ebook or make a few moves in Words With Friends on our tablet. Then sleep, wake and repeat.

While screens have become a constant in our lives, they come with many negative side effects, including eye strain, sleep deprivation, neck strain and a loss of social and creative skills. With the right commitment and a few go-to strategies at hand, you can reduce the number of hours spent in front of a screen. Here are a few ideas to try. Your mind and your body will thank you!

Get outside and leave your smartphone at home or at least in your pocket on silent. Go biking with your kids, take the dog for a stroll, or sweat it out on a brisk walk or jog. Not only will this get you away from your screens, it will get you upright and moving.

Make mealtime non-negotiable. Whether at home, in a restaurant or at the office, commit to sitting down at a table, away from computers and phones, and conversing with friends or family; or if solo, catching up with a good book or simply using the silence to let your mind wander.

Set a reminder and get up and away from your computer at least once an hour while you’re on the job. This is critically important if your job involves mostly desk time. Instead of shooting off an email, get up and deliver your message in person. Go fill up your water bottle, take a quick stroll around the parking lot or to the coffee shop, or do some simple stretches in the employee lounge or conference room. This will give your eyes, back, neck and brain a much-needed break.

Make the bedroom a no-screen zone. Get rid of the television in your bedroom, leave your phone on the kitchen counter, and save your laptop and tablet time for the living room. By not allowing screens in your bedroom, you’ll wind down properly and get much better sleep.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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