RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

12 Tips to Protect Mobile Device Data

March 9, 2016 2:12 am

Cyber criminals are targeting mobile devices in growing numbers. To protect the sensitive data on your devices, it’s important to remain vigilant, even if your financial institution implements preventative measures on your behalf.

“Banks use sophisticated safeguards to protect customer information, and it’s important for consumers to take certain safety measures too,” says Doug Johnson, senior vice president of Payments and Cybersecurity Policy at the American Bankers Association (ABA). “Remember that your smartphone or tablet is like a little computer, and any device used to connect to the Internet needs to be protected.”

Johnson recommends the following 12 steps to ensure your data remain out of the hands of cyber criminals:

1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices. This will make it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.

2. Log out completely when you finish a mobile banking session.

3. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software (malware) by installing mobile security software. 

4. Use caution when downloading apps. Apps can contain malware, worms and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”

5. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps.

6. Avoid storing sensitive information, like passwords or a Social Security number, on your mobile device.

7. Tell your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device.

8. Be aware of “shoulder surfers.” The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings, especially when typing sensitive information.

9. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.

10. Beware of mobile phishing. Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.

11. Watch out for public Wi-Fi. Public connections aren't very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network. 

12. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately. 

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Your Property: New Safety Measures Proposed for Herbicides

March 9, 2016 2:12 am

Herbicides—more commonly known as weed killers—are applied to landscapes to eliminate unwanted plants, such as crabgrass and dandelions.

Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it is proposing steps to prevent poisoning from one of the most widely-used herbicides, paraquat, which has caused several incidents of injury and death.

“We are taking tough steps to prevent people from accidentally drinking paraquat and to ensure these tragic deaths become a thing of the past,” says Jim Jones, assistant administrator for the EPA Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “We are also putting safety measures in place to prevent worker injuries from exposure to this pesticide.”

The EPA is proposing:

• New closed-system packaging designed to make it impossible to transfer or remove the pesticide except directly into the proper application equipment;

• Special training for certified applicators who use paraquat to emphasize that the chemical must not be transferred to or stored in improper containers;

• Changes to the pesticide label and warning materials to highlight the toxicity and risks associated with paraquat;

• Prohibiting application from hand-held and backpack equipment; and

• Restricting the use to certified pesticide applicators only.

Since 2000, there have been 17 fatalities (three involving children) caused by accidental ingestion of paraquat.

Source: EPA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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