RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Replacing a Home Appliance? Why It Pays to Buy New

January 13, 2016 12:45 am

When a major household appliance needs replacing, you may be tempted to save some money by purchasing a used or refurbished model. Be forewarned: what you save now may end up costing you more down the line, according to the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM).

Why? Used or refurbished appliances may not be as efficient as the latest offerings, resulting in higher energy bills.

Consider this: a 20-cubic foot refrigerator manufactured in 1991 consumes, on average, more than 857 kilowatt hours (kWh) a year, while a 22-cubic foot refrigerator carrying the ENERGY-STAR® label manufactured in 2012 consumes only 452 kWh a year. That difference amounts to over $50 in savings per year for the typical household.

Used or refurbished appliances also have the potential to break down, resulting in more costs for repairs. And, secondhand appliances may have a lower life expectancy overall, especially if the previous owner neglected to conduct regular maintenance.

Keep in mind some states and utility companies offer sizable rebates when you purchase new energy-efficient appliances, and even when you recycle your old appliances.

In sum, a new appliance, when designed with energy-efficiency in mind, is a far better deal than a used one.

Source: AHAM

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Now's the Time: Test Your Home for Radon

January 13, 2016 12:45 am

Radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, is responsible for over 20,000 fatalities each year. To avoid exposure to radon, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) strongly advises homeowners to test their homes for elevated levels of radon.

“Radon—a serious health threat to our families and communities—can be easily avoided through testing,” says Ron Curry, regional administrator of the EPA. “Testing for radon will save thousands of lives, prevent burdensome health care costs, and make America’s homes and schools safer for future generations."

You can test your home for radon with an affordable, do-it-yourself kit available at many home improvement and hardware stores, as well as online. If you prefer not to conduct the test yourself, you can hire a qualified radon professional.

If you’re in the market for a new home, make it a point to look for radon-resistant construction—your builder should have this information readily available for you.

Source: EPA.gov

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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