RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Prepping Your Garden in Spring for Summer Bounty – Pt. 1

April 8, 2016 2:09 am

Spring is here, and thousands of homeowners across the country are eyeballing their starter plants, heading to garden centers and plotting out where and what they'll be planting this year.

If you're a little late in launching plans for a home garden, experts say the coming weeks are the best time to get started. The good news is, with little effort and the right equipment, you can enjoy its beauty and harvest, whether in a garden compact enough for a corner of a deck or patio, or one expansive enough to grow food that sustains your family virtually year-round.

According to Brian Bath of “Modern Farmer” (modernfarmer.com), now’s the time to take your gas-powered equipment in for a seasonal tune-up and cleaning. While your power equipment is getting primed for work, Barth says to dig into a thorough check of your hand and digging tools:

• Sand off any rust using steel wool, use a sharpening stone to restore a sharp edge to the blades, and coat the blades and moving parts with a light penetrating oil. (A local hardware store will often offer these services if you’re not up for the task, Barth says.)

• Break the handle on a shovel or digging fork last year? If it’s a good quality tool, it’s worth buying a new handle and replacing it, rather than tossing the whole thing in a landfill. Some gardeners go so far as to sharpen the digging blade of their shovels with a coarse file each year, but at the very least, wash off any accumulated dirt, dry down the blade, and spray it with penetrating oil to ward off rust.

In our next segment, we'll dig into prepping your vegetable garden!

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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More Households Pouring Savings into Rainy Day Funds

April 7, 2016 2:03 am

More households are pouring savings back into rainy day funds.

According to a recently released survey by NeighborWorks America, a non-profit community development organization, more households are setting money aside for an emergency—71 percent of Americans this year versus 63 percent last year.

Predictably, those with a higher income are much more prepared to reserve emergency funds, a survey finding that underscores the fragile financial circumstances many still face. Specifically, 91 percent of Americans surveyed with an annual income above $100,000 have emergency savings, compared to 63 percent with an annual income below $40,000 and 39 percent with an annual income of less than $20,000.

The survey also highlights a significant gap in emergency savings capacity between homeowners and renters. Eighty-four percent of homeowners surveyed with an annual income between $40,000 and $59,000 have saved money in case of emergency; 58 percent of renters in the same income range have done the same.

A similar divergence also occurs at the higher income level: 97 percent of homeowners with an annual income of $100,000 or more report having emergency savings, compared to 67 percent of renters in the same income range.

Source: NeighborWorks America

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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