RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Personal Space: 4 Ways to Add Privacy Inside and Out

August 15, 2017 1:48 am

While a cabin in the woods may not be your thing, there are times when we all crave a little privacy. No matter what your living environs may be, there are several strategies beyond fencing for creating private spaces both inside and outside your home.

Plant a tree wall. While this strategy takes a bit of patience, the payoff is big and permanent. Plant a border of fast-growing evergreen trees - try cypress, arborvitae, juniper or holly - along those perimeters of your yard that are exposed to the street or between you and your too-close neighbor.

Surround your deck or patio. If you’d like a little more privacy when entertaining, plant flowering trees, shrubs or tall grasses around your outdoor gathering space.

Experiment with fabric. Have a great front porch? Try adding breezy drapes that make a great design statement when gathered and drawn, and add romantic privacy when released. You can also section off a secluded area of your porch with an attractive screen.

Screened-in nooks. Screens also work to create private spaces inside your home. Use them to section off a corner of a living room or bedroom and use that space for a small desk, comfy chair or dressing table.

Rethink closet space. Whether it’s a large pantry or a walk-in closet in a bedroom, have it rejiggered to serve as a private workspace instead. Use the shelves to store supplies and add a small desk and chair.

Privacy is possible no matter how small your living space or how close your neighbors may be. Try these ideas and get more inspiration from Pinterest and your favorite home design sites.

If you’re looking for more information on homeownership, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

How to Be a Better Listener as a Boss

August 15, 2017 1:48 am

If you're running a business or a team, you likely have a lot on your mind. Is listening one of them?

"A boss has the opportunity to impact an organization and its employees on many levels, and to serve as a primary catalyst for its future growth and success," says Naphtali Hoff, PsyD, author of the book "Becoming the New Boss: The New Leader's Guide to Sustained Success" (Indie Books International, 2017). "While leading is exciting and fulfilling, it can also be challenging."

One of Hoff's largest bits of insight for being a better boss is to become a better listener. Here are eight listening tips for leaders from Hoff's book:

See eye-to-eye. One crucial element of good listening is making strong eye contact. By fixing your eyes on the speaker, you will avoid becoming distracted while also demanding genuine attention. Eye contact is an important element of all face-to-face communication, even if you know the speaker well.

Use receptive body language. Without saying a word, our bodies communicate much about attitudes and feelings. We need to be aware of this in any conversation that we have. If seated, lean slightly forward to communicate attention. Nod or use other gestures or words that will encourage the speaker to continue.

Position yourself wisely. Always be careful to maintain an appropriate distance between you and the speaker. Being too close may communicate pushiness or lack of respect. If you remain distant, however, you may be seen as cold or disinterested. Body postures matter too in most cultures. The crossing of one's arms or legs, for example, often conveys close-mindedness.

Stop talking and start listening. This is a most basic listening principle, and often the hardest to abide by. When somebody else is talking, it can be very tempting to jump in with a question or comment. This is particularly true when we seek to sound informed, insightful, or if we start to feel defensive due to the speaker's criticisms. Be mindful that a pause, even a long one, does not necessarily mean that the speaker has finished. Let the speaker continue in his or her own time; sometimes it takes a few moments to formulate what to say and how to say it.

Humbly take on their point of view. Approach each conversation from the vantage point of the speaker. Seek to empathize and to objectively consider their position, regardless of their rank. Be humble enough to listen carefully, even if you disagree with what is being said.

Summarize and clarify. When the other person has finished talking, take a moment to restate and clarify what you have heard. Use language like, "So, to summarize, I think you said…" End by asking whether you heard correctly, which will encourage immediate feedback. considering the message that was just shared.

Leave the door open. Keep open the possibility of additional communication after this conversation has ended. You never know when new insights or concerns may emerge.

Thank them for approaching you. Do not take any conversation for granted. For many employees, requesting a meeting requires that they summon much courage and rehearse their message time and again. Moreover, you probably learned something useful and meaningful during your talk: information or ideas that may help you as the leader.

Source: http://www.indiebooksintl.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: