RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

3 Ways to Waterproof Your House

July 19, 2016 1:18 am

Did you know water can enter and damage your home at any time, whether your house is in a low-lying area or otherwise?

“There are common water hazards that every homeowner faces at one time or another,” explains Michael Petri of Petri Plumbing and Heating, Inc. “It's a lot simpler than many people think to waterproof their homes and avoid those issues.”

Waterproofing your home not only guards it against flooding, but also eliminates unseen internal leaks. (Leaks, in fact, account for close to 15 percent of the average household’s water use.)

To waterproof your house, Petri recommends:

Scanning Pipes – Walk your property and note areas of mud or soil erosion, or wet spots on the driveway. These findings could indicate a broken pipe, which will require the services of a professional plumber to remedy.

Inspecting Sprinkler Heads – Look for vibrant green vegetation or moss growth on or around the sprinkler heads on your property. These may be signs of broken heads or damaged valves leaking into the ground (and potentially breaching your home).

Testing Toilet(s) for Leaks – Drip a few drops of food dye into the tank of the toilet. Wait 20 minutes; if a leak is found, replace the valve inside the tank.

These three types of leaks can develop in any house, both new and older, or on any property. If you suspect an irrigation or underground leak, call a professional plumber as soon as possible for help—continuous leaking can not only lead to extensive damage, but also can result in additional month-to-month costs.

Source: Petri Plumbing and Heating, Inc.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


What Role Does Insurance Play in Home-Sharing?

July 19, 2016 1:18 am

As the sharing economy hits its stride, more every-people are taking advantage of home-sharing platforms like Airbnb, HomeAway and VRBO. The ease-of-use of these platforms, however, should not detract from insurance considerations, says John M. Huff, president of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).

“Sharing a home, car or even personal items with a complete stranger reflects a new level of trust between buyers and sellers,” Huff said in a statement. “When using companies like Uber and Airbnb, or lesser-known options such as Poshmark and TaskRabbit, failing to understand the insurance implications of these transactions can be costly. The NAIC encourages consumers to share with care.”

To determine adequate insurance coverage, home-sharers should discuss their intentions with their insurance provider, the NAIC recommends. The home-sharer may be required to supplement a standard homeowners insurance policy with additional liability coverage, home-based business coverage, or even landlord insurance.

The NAIC suggests the home-sharer confirm the damaged-related coverage an existing policy offers, as well. Home-sharers may opt to limit rentals to those who can show proof of homeowners, renters or personal liability insurance, so that they will be able to file a claim on the renter’s policy should the renter damage the property.

Most importantly, home-sharers should stay up-to-date on the policies and terms of use of each sharing platform. Home-sharing agreements are apt to change, and often, according to the NAIC.

Source: National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC)

Published with permission from RISMedia.