RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Are You Paying Too Much for Flood Insurance?

July 25, 2016 1:24 am

Property owners of both residential and commercial units purchased more than $3.5 billion in flood policies last year through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The reason? More lenders may be requiring flood insurance—and yours could ask for it, too.

Insuring your home against flood risk is important, but it is also important to understand its cost. One way to ensure cost-control is with an error-free elevation certificate, says Michael Allison, president of AmeriFlood Solutions, Inc.

The elevation certificate is a document that indicates the elevation of the property, which determines insurance premium rates. The certificate must be free of errors and omissions—either could potentially cost thousands in needless expense, Allison says.

“A signed and sealed elevation certificated does not ensure accuracy,” Allison said in a statement. “More than 50 percent of the elevation certificates reviewed by our staff have errors. Further, outdated elevation certificates may not reflect building improvements or uncover documentation errors or omissions that can cause insurance agents, brokers and carriers to rate flood policies inaccurately. That can add up to a considerable difference in the amount paid for coverage or measures implemented to mitigate flood damage.”

Allison recommends reviewing the elevation certificate with an insurance broker or agent or flood risk expert—they can help you determine if you are paying too much (or too little) for flood insurance.

Source: AmeriFlood Solutions, Inc.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


The Case for Siding with Brick

July 25, 2016 1:24 am

There are many benefits to building and owning a home with a brick exterior—many of which outweigh the cost.

“The initial cost of a brick home is quite competitive, especially since most homes require less exterior cladding than people think,” said Ray Leonhard, president and CEO of the Brick Industry Association (BIA), in a statement. “An average 2,700-square-foot, two-story house only needs 2,265 square feet of cladding material when accounting for windows, doors, etc.”

According to “The Installed Cost of Residential Siding,” a report by the BIA comparing brick to other types of siding, brick wall cladding can cost up to 15 percent less than stone veneer, up to 8 percent more than vinyl siding, up to 6 percent more than fiber cement siding or wood shingles, and up to 3 percent more than stucco or wood siding.

In approximately 65 percent of the major housing areas assessed in the report, brick costs less than stone and wood siding—an important distinction for new-home builders in hot markets like Austin, Texas, Charlotte, N.C., and Denver, Colo.

Some brick manufacturers offer 100-year warranties—a testament to the durability of the material, Leonhard said. Brick is relatively low-maintenance, with no painting required, and boasts insulation properties that not only reduce energy consumption, but also reduce noise.

Brick homes are also better outfitted to guard against fire and wind, which can be a boon in disaster situations, Leonhard added.

To learn more about brick homes, visit

Source: Brick Industry Association (BIA)

Published with permission from RISMedia.