RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Spring Forward: Remember to Test Smoke Alarms, Carbon Monoxide Detectors

March 10, 2016 2:15 am

Daylight Saving Time begins this weekend, historically serving as a reminder for homeowners to test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Most homeowners, however, neglect this important, potentially life-saving task.

According to a recent survey by Mister Sparky® electricians, just over 40 percent of homeowners test their smoke alarms each month; nearly 35 percent don’t conduct monthly tests, nor replace alarms every 10 years, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). What’s more, one-third of homeowners do not have a working carbon monoxide detector.

The NFPA advises homeowners install smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors outside of each bedroom or sleeping area, interconnecting them so that when one sounds, they all sound. If you need assistance installing alarms or detectors in your home, contact a licensed electrical professional.

Source: Mister Sparky®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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12 Tips to Protect Mobile Device Data

March 9, 2016 2:12 am

Cyber criminals are targeting mobile devices in growing numbers. To protect the sensitive data on your devices, it’s important to remain vigilant, even if your financial institution implements preventative measures on your behalf.

“Banks use sophisticated safeguards to protect customer information, and it’s important for consumers to take certain safety measures too,” says Doug Johnson, senior vice president of Payments and Cybersecurity Policy at the American Bankers Association (ABA). “Remember that your smartphone or tablet is like a little computer, and any device used to connect to the Internet needs to be protected.”

Johnson recommends the following 12 steps to ensure your data remain out of the hands of cyber criminals:

1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices. This will make it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.

2. Log out completely when you finish a mobile banking session.

3. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software (malware) by installing mobile security software. 

4. Use caution when downloading apps. Apps can contain malware, worms and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”

5. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps.

6. Avoid storing sensitive information, like passwords or a Social Security number, on your mobile device.

7. Tell your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device.

8. Be aware of “shoulder surfers.” The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings, especially when typing sensitive information.

9. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.

10. Beware of mobile phishing. Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.

11. Watch out for public Wi-Fi. Public connections aren't very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network. 

12. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately. 

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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