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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

The Top Source of Workplace Stress? Unpredictability

February 11, 2016 1:42 am

It pays to prepare for the unexpected. “Unpredictability” was named the top source of work-related stress by 26 percent of respondents in a recently released CareerCast poll, with the most taxing occupations including enlisted military, firefighters, police officers, public relations executives and event coordinators.

"Life is filled with stressors—from worrying you're going to lose your job because the company lost a big account to having a sick child at home," says Kyle Kensing, online content editor for CareerCast. "Much of the pressure we feel occurs in the eight or so hours we spend at work and we asked our readers to sound off on their stress factors."

Other common factors influencing work-related stress levels include:

• Workplace Environment (21 percent)
• Deadlines (20 percent)
• Safety of Others (16 percent)

The least stressful aspect of the workplace is business travel, named a stressor by just 1 percent of poll respondents. Few people felt the following stressors contributed to work-related stress levels, as well:

• Potential for Promotion (3 percent)
• Personal Well-Being in Danger (5 percent)
• Length of Work Day/Week (7 percent)

If you find yourself one of the majority stressed over unpredictability at work, you may find reprieve as a hair stylist, medical records technician, jeweler or librarian—professions named least stressful, according to poll results.

Source: CareerCast

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Steps to Ensure Water Quality at Home

February 11, 2016 1:42 am

The lead contamination crisis in Flint, Mich., has brought to light possible occurrences in other areas of the country. Unsafe lead levels in tap water can be harmful, particularly to pregnant women and children. If faced with contaminated tap water, steps to reduce exposure should be taken as soon as possible. Per the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

• Clean out faucet aerators by unscrewing the aerator at the tip of the faucet and removing any debris. Aerators are located at the tip of household faucets and have a screen to collect particles and sediment.

• Flush hot water tanks to remove sediments that may have been deposited into the tank.

• Clean whole-house water filtration systems by flushing the system and changing the cartridge.

• Have your water tested to be sure lead levels are below 150 parts per billion.

• Pregnant women and children under six should drink bottled water until they get results showing their water is below 150 parts per billion. After that point, they should only drink water that has been through an NSF-certified, lead removal filter.

Source: EPA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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