RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Are You Making Clear Decisions About Replacement Windows?

August 9, 2016 1:54 am

When is the right time to replace windows?

That's a question I recently had to weigh, and, lucikly, my decision turned out to be a good one.

For those weighing that decision themselves, Window World of Altoona, Pa., offers a list of questions to help make a clear decision about whether to replace a window.

Should you DIY or hire a pro? The window fit, installation and type can make or break a replacement project. If you’re hiring a company to replace wood or metal windows, research the reputation of the firm. Look for a professional that backs their installation with a warranty on labor and parts, in addition to a product warranty.

How long do you plan to be living with your new windows? While aesthetic, energy savings and maintenance are common considerations, keep in mind that vinyl windows recoup an average of 78 percent at resale, and can be a selling point to prospective homebuyers—especially if providing a transferable warranty to the new homeowner.

Have you done your homework? Look for credible, independent, third-party endorsements on the windows you're considering, such as those from Good Housekeeping, AAMA (American Architectural Manufacturers Association), NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Council) and the ENERGY STAR® label.

Have you considered your energy efficiency options? If your home is located in a warmer, sunny area, a product's Solar Heat Gain Coefficient measurement is important. Consider a window with heat-reflective, low-emissive glass to not only block the sun’s rays in summer, but to also prevent heat loss in winter.

To learn more about window replacement—and check out a handy window design tool—visit

Published with permission from RISMedia.


What to Do If Your Home Has Radon

August 9, 2016 1:54 am

Do you know radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S.?

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), most homes with high levels of radon gas can be remedied. If you have tested your home for radon and have confirmed elevated radon levels (4 picocuries per liter in air [pCi/L] or higher), consult your local health agency or radon authority for help to:

Select a qualified radon mitigation contractor. The EPA recommends working with a state-certified and/or qualified radon mitigation contractor trained to remedy radon issues.

Determine an appropriate radon reduction method.

Maintain your radon reduction system. Some radon reduction systems mitigate radon levels by up to 99 percent.

The cost to reduce radon generally ranges from $800 to $2,500, according to the EPA. Most types of radon reduction systems cause some loss of heated or air conditioned air, which could also increase utility bills. How much of an increase will depend on the climate you live in, what kind of reduction system you select, and how your house is built.

For most cases, the EPA recommends methods that prevent the entry of radon. Soil suction, for example, prevents radon from entering your home by drawing radon from below the house and venting it through a pipe above the house, where it is diluted. In houses that have a basement or a slab-on-grade foundation, radon can be reduced by one of four types of soil suction: subslab suction, drain tile suction, sump hole suction, or block wall suction. In houses that have a crawlspace, radon can be redocued through sub-membrane suction, a process in which radon is drawn from underneath a high-density plastic sheet covering the ground below the house.

Other radon reduction techniques, according to the EPA, include sealing, pressurization, heat recovery ventilation, and natural ventilation.

For assistance with radon reduction, call 1-800-SOS-RADON, or visit

Published with permission from RISMedia.