RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Go Green to Save Green: 5 Eco-Friendly Home Improvement Tips

April 6, 2016 2:03 am

(BPT)—Upgrading your home can impact its carbon footprint. Ensure that impact is for the better with these eco-friendly home improvement tips!

1. Choose Green Materials –Select materials that have a low impact on the environment. Reclaimed wood, for example, is renewable. Other eco-friendly alternatives include linoleum (instead of vinyl), low- or no-VOC (volatile organic compounds) paints, bamboo and cork.

2. Rent Tools – Think twice before purchasing tools for the project. Renting tools not only saves you money, but also limits the energy consumption, pollution and waste associated with manufacturing, storing and maintaining new equipment. Visit RentalHQ.com to find the tools you need.

3. Hire Eco-Minded Professionals – If you're undertaking a large-scale remodel, make your green goals heard. Seek out contractors and design professionals that will keep the environment front and center.

4. Use Energy-Efficient Equipment – If the project involves upgrading appliances, implement products with the ENERGY STAR® label—this means that the product meets government standards for energy efficiency.

5. Invest in Water-Saving Features – For kitchen or bath remodels, consider installing low-flow faucets, dishwashers, toilets or showerhead—these significantly conserve water, and can save you hundreds on your bills each year.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Savings Plans Boost Retirement Confidence

April 5, 2016 12:03 am

Retirement concerns have become magnified as a result of the recession, but uncertainty has begun to level off, offering evidence of recovering financial circumstances for pre-retirees, or “workers,” according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute’s (EBRI) annual Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS).

Gauging confidence about income, the survey found 21 percent of workers feel “very confident” about having enough money for a comfortable retirement. Forty-two percent of workers feel “somewhat confident”—up over 5 percent in the last year.

Workers surveyed who reported they or their spouse have money in a defined contribution (DC) plan or individual retirement account (IRA), or have benefits in a defined benefit (DB) plan from a current or previous employer, are more than twice as likely as those without any of these plans (26 percent versus 10 percent) to feel “very confident.”

“Among those who are confident about retirement, it’s overwhelmingly among those who have a retirement plan,” says Jack VanDerhei, research director for the EBRI and co-author of the survey.

Workers who currently aren’t saving enough for retirement plan to cope with the shortfall by “saving more later on” or “working longer,” according to survey results. This is counter to the findings of retirees surveyed: many reported being unable to work longer due to health concerns.

The survey results also point to a debt-confidence correlation: just 9 percent of workers who described their debt as a major problem say they are very confident about having enough money to live comfortably in retirement, compared with 32 percent of workers who indicated debt is not a problem.

Notably, less than half of workers (48 percent) report having calculated how much money they will need to have saved for a comfortable retirement; 39 percent simply guessed how much they will need to accumulate.

Chiefly driving these trends is the desire to postpone retirement. Thirty-seven percent of workers cited in the survey expect to retire after age 65—contradictory to the experience retirees reported.

Source: EBRI

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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