RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Want to Increase Your Home’s Value? Look No Further than Your Closet

April 20, 2017 2:27 am

Before you embark on adding another bathroom or installing brand new kitchen appliances, consider a much simpler way to add value to your home: an updated closet.

According to CNBC’s “The Deed” star, Sydney Torres says, there’s money to be made in closets. By making a relatively small investment in customizing and maximizing the space in your home’s existing closets, you can see a nice return on your investment, advises the real estate mogul.

HGTV experts recommend revamping closets in the rooms where people need the most storage: the master bedroom and the kitchen. No matter which room the closet resides in, your goal should always be about creating organization and space.

In bedroom closets, consider adding custom drawers, shoe racks and shelves. On a budget? Decorative baskets and fabric-lined boxes can do the trick. Make the most of walk-in closets by adding a bureau or a center island with drawers. Also consider the popular trend of converting existing closet space into his and her closets. If your closets are tall enough, double the available space by adding two hanging bars.

Also consider your closet doors. If you have a single door or sliding doors, for example, modernize the look by replacing them with double doors.

In kitchen closets, add hooks for hanging pots and linens on the inside door, and also tack up a cork or chalk board. Use see-through storage containers for housing flour, sugar, rice and dried legumes, and install a lazy susan for quickly finding items. Maximize floor space with decorative baskets to store paper towels, garbage bags and cleaning supplies.

Investing in your closet space will not only add to your home’s value, it will enhance your quality of life at home for years to come.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Spring Clean Your Digital Life

April 20, 2017 2:27 am

Spring cleaning may call you to empty those closets, wash the windows and lug mountains of items to the local thrift store. But have you ever considered paying the same attention to your digital spaces?

NCSA has identified our top, trouble-free tips that everyone should follow this spring.

- Keep a clean machine: Ensure all software on internet-connected devices – including PCs, smartphones and tablets – is up to date to reduce risk of infection from malware.

- Lock down your login: Your usernames and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, banking and social media. Begin your spring cleaning by fortifying your online accounts and enabling the strongest authentication tools available, such as biometrics, security keys or a unique one-time code through an app on your mobile device.

- Declutter your mobile life: Most of us have apps we no longer use and some that need updating. Delete unused apps and keep others current, including the operating system on your mobile device. An added benefit of deleting unused apps is more storage space and longer battery life. Actively manage your location services, Bluetooth, microphone and camera – making sure apps use them appropriately.

- Do a digital file purge: Perform a good, thorough review of your online files. Tend to your digital records, PCs, phones and any device with storage just as you do for paper files. Get started by doing the following: 

- Clean up your email: Save only those emails you really need and unsubscribe to email you no longer need/want to receive.

- Back it up: Copy important data to a secure cloud site or another computer or drive where it can be safely stored. Password protect backup drives. Make sure to back up your files before getting rid of a device, too. 

- Own your online presence: Review the privacy and security settings on websites you use to be sure that they remain set to your comfort level for sharing. It's OK to limit how and with whom you share information.

- Know what devices to digitally "shred": Computers and mobile phones aren't the only devices that capture and store sensitive, personal data. External hard drives and USBs, tape drives, embedded flash memory, wearables, networking equipment and office tools like copiers, printers and fax machines all contain valuable, personal information. 

- Clear out stockpiles: If you have a stash of old hard drives or other devices – even if they're in a locked storage area – information still exists and could be stolen. Don't wait: wipe and/or destroy unneeded hard drives as soon as possible.

- Empty your trash or recycle bin on all devices and be certain to wipe and overwrite: Simply deleting and emptying the trash isn't enough to completely get rid of a file. You must permanently delete old files. Use a program that deletes the data, "wipes" it from your device and then overwrites it by putting random data in place of your information ‒ that then cannot be retrieved.

Source: The National Cyber Security Alliance

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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