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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Relocating? Slow and Steady Wins the Move

June 2, 2016 1:45 am

Forty million Americans are set to pack up and move this summer. That’s a lot of stress in one season!

One of the most concerning steps in the moving process is packing—determining what stays, what goes, and what gets stored. More than half of Americans describe their home as “cluttered,” according to a recent SpareFoot survey, making relocating that much more challenging, especially when “letting go” is difficult.

Guilt, the SpareFoot survey found, is associated with keeping items past their prime—91 percent of Americans surveyed hung onto an item because they felt guilty tossing it. Common guilt-inducing items include gifts, family heirlooms, rarely-worn clothing, greeting cards, and drawings and crafts made by children.

“We often don't think about why we keep certain things, but rather just ‘go through the motions,’” explains clinical psychologist Dr. Susan Bartell. “In reality, most people keep things to hold onto the past, and in hope for a better future. We hold onto items that remind us of happier times, past relationships and our childhood, but also things that we think we will need, such as clothing in a smaller size, our kids' toys, and legacy items.”

This keep-everything mindset may cater to our sentimental natures, but it can be a disadvantage in the day-to-day comings and goings of the average household: close to one-third of Americans surveyed by SpareFoot spend two or more hours each week looking for a misplaced item in their cluttered home.

Dr. Bartell’s best advice for relocators?

“If you're looking to declutter or downsize, it's best to take it slow. Getting rid of personal things can be a very emotional process, and something that shouldn't be rushed. If you're in a time crunch, consider a storage unit or temporary storage at a friend's home.”

Source: SpareFoot

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The New Nutrition Facts Label, Explained

June 1, 2016 1:42 am

The nutritional value chart labeled on most food and drink items will change to reflect shifting health ideals—the first alteration to the label in over 20 years.

Recently announced by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the new Nutrition Facts Panel will offer more up-to-date information for consumers.

“Our understanding of a ‘serving size’ has changed over the years,” explains Lori Zanini, registered dietitian nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “The new Panel now lists serving size as what is typically eaten in one sitting. This new format will help by easing or even eliminating the need to multiply several servings and daily value percentages to know how much has been consumed.”

The serving size on a 12-ounce beverage, for instance, will now be listed as one serving, since a person typically drinks the whole amount at one time.

“People should also know that the serving size does not necessarily reflect the recommended portion size,” Zanini cautions. “The MyPlate guidelines are a great resource for understanding proper portion sizes.”

The change will also do away with the Vitamin A and Vitamin C quantities currently listed on the label, and instead include the amounts of Vitamin D and potassium.

“Many people do not consume these nutrients in sufficient amounts,” says Zanini.

The new label will identify added sugars, as well.

“To provide a better understanding of naturally-occurring versus sugars that are added to a product, added sugars will now be listed as an indented sub-item under total sugars,” Zanini explains.

Daily Values (DV) will also become easier to calculate under the new label. DVs are the average levels of nutrients for a person eating 2,000 calories a day—a food item with a 5 percent DV of sodium provides 5 percent of the total sodium that the person should eat each day. Consumers should aim for high DVs in vitamins and minerals, Zanini advises.

“While fully understanding the Nutrition Fact Panel can be confusing, many grocery stores now have registered dietitian nutritionists on staff to help their customers understand how to read labels and select the right foods for their customers' healthy eating plans,” adds Zanini.

Visit EatRight.org to learn more about the new label, or to locate a registered dietitian nutritionist in your area.

Source: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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