RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Homeowners Insurance Costs Creeping Up? Here's Why

April 26, 2016 12:30 am

Most homeowners don't consider themselves magicians, but we know you have to keep a number of plates spinning to ensure all the demands of your home are met. One of the most important is maintaining the appropriate amount of homeowners insurance coverage.

The National Association of Insurance Commissioners' (NAIC) recently released their latest Homeowners Insurance Report, providing data on market distribution and average cost by policy form and amount of insurance. John M. Huff, president of the NAIC, says the report is the largest insurance repository of data and analysis, with an abundance of resources to help homeowners and renters make informed decisions.

National- and state-specific premium and exposure information for homeowners insurance policies and non-commercial dwelling fire insurance is included in the report. It also contains data descriptions and a discussion about the way certain economic, demographic and natural phenomena impact the cost of homeowners insurance.

If you’re looking to understand exactly why you’re paying the amount you are for homeowners or other types of insurance protection, drill into the report’s tables, which show your state and countrywide exposures by policy type, individual policy form and insurance coverage amount.

According to the report—validating why we frequently report on this particular natural hazard—Superstorm Sandy represented seven of the top 10 most costly occurrences from an insurance perspective since data collection began. A 2011 Alabama tornado, the Northridge, Calif., earthquake and 9/11 rounded out the list.

Learn how the insurance industry calculates the cost of policies by visiting www.naic.org/documents/prod_serv_statistical_hmr_zu.pdf.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Energy-Efficient Home Upgrades

April 26, 2016 12:30 am

Did you know that the energy used by homes in the U.S. accounts for almost one-quarter of the country’s overall energy consumption? Or that the average household spends upwards of $2,200 a month on utilities?

Improving your home’s energy efficiency can be accomplished in several ways, ranging from inexpensive upgrades to out-of-bounds costly overhauls.

“From whole-home energy audits to simply swapping out a water-guzzling toilet, there are dozens of ways homeowners can make their homes more energy-efficient,” says Mike Agugliaro, co-owner of New Jersey-based Gold Medal Service. “Even a few small changes can have a big impact on energy consumption, helping the Earth and helping to lower energy bills at the same time.”

Agugliaro recommends homeowners start with these five upgrades:

1. Ceiling Fans – Installing ceiling fans in your home is a low-cost way to reduce energy consumption. On hot days, ceiling fans can cut cooling costs by up to 40 percent, and on colder days, they help circulate air, saving you up to 10 percent on heating costs.

2. LED Lights – Swap out incandescent light bulbs for ENERGY STAR®-qualified LED lights—you'll consume a whopping 75 percent less energy! LED lights also last up to 50 times longer than incandescent ones, and up to five times longer than fluorescent ones, saving you the expense of replacement.

3. Smart Thermostat – Programmable thermostats can instantly make your heating and cooling system more efficient. The latest models allow you to set temperatures for different times of day, so you aren't paying to heat or cool your home when no one is there.

4. Tankless Water Heater – Tankless water heaters—sometimes called “on-demand”—heat water as needed. ENERGY STAR® tankless water heaters can reduce your annual water costs by up to 30 percent. They last nearly 20 years—double the lifespan of a traditional hot water heater.

5. Whole-Home Energy System – The average home is hit with over 20 energy spikes each day. These can wreak havoc on your energy bills. Prevent them from occurring with a home energy management system with surge protection.

For those who want a hand improving the energy efficiency of their homes, an HVAC, plumbing and electrical professional can assess current energy usage and recommend ways to make the home more efficient.

Source: Gold Medal Service

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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