RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Is It Time to Evaluate Your Trees? Pt. 1

July 5, 2016 12:57 am


Having the trees on your property inspected regularly can help identify distress or decay before it becomes critical—and costly.

The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA) (TreeCareTips.org) recommends hiring a trained arborist to conduct a formal risk assessment. Several risk assessment methods exist, but three are the most widely accepted in North America:

• International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Tree Hazard Evaluation Method
• ISA Tree Risk Assessment Best Management Practice (BMP) Method  
• United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service Community TreeRisk Evaluation Method

These methods are employed most often by tree care professionals, municipal forestry programs and government agencies. Before hiring an arborist, discuss which method will be used to evaluate your trees.

After the assessment, the arborist may give you a written or oral report with recommendations to mitigate any risks your trees may pose. Generally, there are three ways to reduce risk: removing the tree, treating the tree or treating the site. More than one option may be used depending on the situation, according to the TCIA.

An assessment is a wise step to take even if your trees appear safe, the TCIA adds. It is best to have a professional verify the safety of the trees on your property, especially if they hang over your house or other structures on your property.

In Pt. 2, we’ll take a look at the pros and cons of each assessment method.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What Budget? Remodeling Spend on the Rise

July 5, 2016 12:57 am


Homeowners are sinking more money into renovations, driving up the average remodeling spend—and many are doing so without a set budget.

That’s according to results of the recently released Houzz & Home survey by Houzz.com, which revealed that approximately one-third of homeowners either exceed their remodeling budget (by thousands!) or do not have a budget at all. Those who exceed their budget often do so due to costlier materials or design changes.

Homeowners are set on re-doing the kitchen and bathrooms first, budget or no budget, according to the survey. Many of these renovations are undertaken by recent homebuyers who want to improve their new home, by those who “finally” have the financial means to do so, or by soon-to-be home sellers.

The survey revealed recent homebuyers tend to invest more, on average, in remodeling projects—$66,600 versus $59,800 by other homeowners. Home sellers, on the other hand, spend less—$36,300, on average.

Whatever the spend, most homeowners pay for the project with personal funds or savings, according to the survey. Some, still, use credit cards or home equity lines of credit (HELOCs).

Homeowners are shelling out these funds to professionals, such as remodelers, general contractors or a design-build company, the survey found. Some homeowners are hiring architects or interior designers, as well.

Upgrading your home to sell? Talk to a real estate professional. He or she can offer guidance as to which projects recoup the most money at resale.

Source: Houzz.com
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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