RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Prepping Your Garden in Spring for Summer Bounty – Pt. 2

April 12, 2016 2:15 am

In our last segment, we discussed the preparation needed to start your own vegetable garden. Returning to a recent blog by Brian Bath of Modern Farmer (modernfarmer.com), let’s dig into more of those steps.

Barth says once the soil in your vegetable garden is dry enough to not squish when you step on it, it’s time to start laying the groundwork for spring planting:

Clean Out: Remove any leftover veggies that didn’t survive the winter and toss them into a compost pile. Pull out any drip irrigation tubes to make way for tilling and planting. If you planted cover crops in the fall, mow them to the ground and then let the stems dry out for a couple weeks before tilling in the debris. If you mulched your beds in fall, rake off the mulch and add it to the compost pile.

Top Up the Fertility: Spread a fresh layer of compost on your beds—Barth suggests one to two inches—and till it in. Add supplementary nutrients like lime (for acidic soils), sulfur (for basic soils), bone meal (for phosphorus), greensand (for potassium), and kelp meal (for micronutrients). Till in the compost and amendments, but only once the soil is dry enough to crumble when you grab a handful. Rake the beds into smooth, ready-to-plant mounds.

Barth also recommends getting a soil test to fine-tune your fertility management strategy. Have the test annually to ensure what you are trying to grow has the best chance of reaping you a bounty.

Many state, county and local agencies, as well as universities, supply low-cost or free soil testing, along with advice on how to alter soil qualities for the veggies you want to grow, or which types of plantings may not do so well in your garden.

Homeowners and gardeners can learn a lot about soils in their own region by consulting the annual soil surveys available through the USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service: www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/soils/home/.

In our final segment, we'll take a look at a few of the foods you can grow with very limited yard space.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Homeowners: Your Flood Risk May Be Higher Than You Think

April 12, 2016 2:15 am

The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) reports less than 15 percent of homeowners and renters have flood insurance—but nine out of 10 natural disasters involve some level of flooding.

“Too few residences are covered by flood insurance policies because many homeowners and renters underestimate their flood risk,” says Jeanne Salvatore, the I.I.I.’s senior vice president for Public Affairs and chief communications officer, noting that 20 percent of all flood claims come from moderate-to-low flood risk areas. “Most Americans should, at the very least, consider acquiring flood insurance because standard homeowners and renters policies do not cover flood-caused damage.”

Flood insurance is available to homeowners and renters from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and a few private insurance companies. Excess flood insurance policies can also be purchased by homeowners seeking coverage above and beyond the basic NFIP policy, which is capped at $250,000 for structural damage and $100,000 for contents. Those residing in a community that does not participate in FEMA’s NFIP also have the option to purchase an excess policy.

“There is a 30-day waiting period between buying an NFIP policy, and when the coverage takes effect, so those residing along the Gulf and Atlantic coastlines may want to act soon, because hurricane season starts on June 1,” Salvatore adds.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) projects elevated risk of moderate flooding in the South and areas along the Missouri River basin this year.

Source: I.I.I.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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