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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

3 Ways Pups Can Improve Seniors' Health

August 28, 2017 1:03 am

(Family Features)--Furry friends can play a significant role in pet owners' lives. The old saying goes, "dogs are man's best friend," and research shows they may be more than that. In fact, they just might be the key to keeping seniors active.

According to a study conducted by the University of Lincoln and Glasgow Caledonian University in collaboration with Mars Petcare Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, dog owners 65 and older were found to walk over 20 minutes more a day than seniors who did not have canine companions at home.

The study documented three key conclusions:

1. Dog owners walked further and for longer than non-dog owners.
2. Dog owners were more likely to reach recommended activity levels.
3. Dog owners had fewer periods of sitting down.

"Older adult dog owners are more active than those without dogs and are also more likely to meet government recommendations for daily physical activity," says Nancy Gee, human animal interaction researcher at Waltham. "We are learning more every day about the important roles pets play in our lives, so it's no surprise that pets are now in more than 84 million households. It's great to recognize how pets can help improve seniors' lives."

Walking with your pup can help both the pet and owner get in shape. Pets can keep older adults active and even help them meet the recommended public health guidelines for weekly physical activity. According to the study, on average, dog owners more often participated in 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity and achieved 2,760 additional steps.  

However, the benefits of pet ownership go beyond physical activity. It's no secret that pets provide companionship. From reducing rates of stress, depression and feelings of social isolation, pets can play a significant role in improving people's lives, which ultimately can make pet owners happier and healthier.

Not only do pets serve as companions in their own right, studies have shown that dog owners can get to know their neighbors through their pets. Pets can even help facilitate the initial meeting and conversation, which may come as no surprise for many dog owners who have chatted with others while walking their dogs. For older adults who live alone or in a group facility, having a pet is also a great way to build relationships with others.

As senior citizens are celebrated on upcoming days that acknowledge older adults, it turns out living with a pet can be a healthy choice for seniors in more ways than one.

Source: Mars Petcare

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Necessities and Niceties for Your Newborn

August 25, 2017 2:00 am

Parents-to-be – and new grandparents – are sometimes overwhelmed at the amount of ‘stuff’  a new baby requires. But while some equipment is essential to baby’s well-being, not all baby gear is created equal.

Before you shop, check the necessities and niceties suggested by Parents Magazine:

The Must-Haves:
- Crib and mattress – There are many reasonably priced cribs on the market, and a ‘gently used’ crib that meets safety standards can save big bucks. But do buy a new mattress.
- Bedding – Choose sheets that fit snugly around the mattress. Steer clear of potential safety hazards like pillows, quilts, and even bumper pads.
- Changing pad – A sturdy one with a safety strap is a must. But put it atop a low-profile chest of drawers the child can use for years instead of investing in a changing table that will soon be consigned to the attic.
- Basic diaper pail – Fancy diaper disposal pails and refills are costly and store up odors. Consider a simple, easily emptied diaper pail lined with plastic grocery bags.
- A comfy chair – At feeding time, or when baby is fussy, a comfy chair or rocker can be a blessing. Before you buy new, check the ads for a good, used recliner or glider.
- Car seat – This is the single most important item you can purchase. Nothing will do more to protect an infant, and hospitals generally won't allow you to take the baby home without one. Put your money on a new one rather than used.
- Infant carrier -- Front carriers and slings free up your hands and are very packable – and consider a standard infant carrier, usually a molded bucket seat lined with soft cushioning. Some parents find babies love to sleep in their infant carriers, even at home.
- Baby seat – The infant carrier is a safe spot for baby to sit. But after the first six weeks, most parents want a more entertaining contraption. Options range from simple bouncing seats to battery-operated swings to baby gyms/activity centers. Good used choices are easy to find.
- Stroller - Invest in a combo stroller system that can be used through several stages of growth.
- Bath tub – Most are inexpensive – or consider a spongy tub or sink liner.

The Niceties
If you can stretch your budget, consider:
- Baby monitor
- Crib mobile
- Hooded towels
- Backpack-style carrier

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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