RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Ways to Grow a Garden…Without a Garden

April 28, 2016 12:33 am

Apartments and condos rarely offer much opportunity to garden, even with balconies or patios. ApartmentTherapy.com recently rounded up container gardening tips that’ll help satisfy small-space green thumbs. Some are viable even in apartments with no outdoor space at all!

1. Ceramic Pots – Dwarf fruit trees, such as Calamondin Orange, Eureka Lemon, Improved Meyer, Orangequat, Persian Lime and Ponderosa, do well in ceramic pots. Consult with experts at your local nursery for the proper mix of soil. Ensure the trees receive plenty of sunshine and regular watering.

2. Jars – Plant slow-growing herbs in mason jars, which can be purchased at your local hardware or housewares store. Mount them vertically on a board out on the patio, or set them out on your kitchen counter, tied with decorative ribbon or rope.

3. Shoe Organizer – Hang up a vinyl shoe organizer, and fill each compartment with potting soil and plants, such as mixed salad leaves, herbs, sorrel, peas, and mini tomatoes.

4. Water Container – Container water gardens are a collection of submerged potted plants. Pots with dark interiors give the impression of depth and discourage algae. Place bricks below the surface to vary the height of the plants; tall grasses, cascading species and water flowers are ideal. Top up the water in your container every few days.

5. Wine Boxes – Buy (or wheedle a few) wooden wine boxes from your local liquor store. Place them on a table or on the floor of your balcony or patio. Fill them with potting soil and small-growing plants, like cherry tomatoes, radishes, some lettuce varieties and herbs.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Refund Refurbish: Paint Your Home!

April 28, 2016 12:33 am

Eight in 10 taxpayers receive refunds each year. Most will obtain their refunds in May or June—ideal months for paint projects. What better way to purpose your tax refund than improving your home with paint?

Because paint is a relatively inexpensive product, your refund doesn’t have to be substantial to have an impact. According to the Paint Quality Institute, supplies for an interior painting project cost less than $100. In fact, if you’re a taxpayer receiving the average $2,800 refund, you can feasibly repaint the entire interior of your home!

Exterior painting is more costly, but your refund may cover a significant portion of the expense, including the product. The quality of ordinary exterior paint lasts for about four years; 100 percent-acrylic latex paint lasts 10 years. Purchasing a durable product is ultimately more cost-effective than buying a less expensive alternative.

Consider spending your refund on small-scale paint projects, too, such as a applying a fresh coat on the front door or an accent color in a built-in feature. These minor improvements will have major effects come resale.

Keep in mind, also, that if you run a home-based business, some of your painting expenses may be tax-deductible on next year’s return. Be sure to consult with your tax professional to determine your eligibility.

How are you purposing this year’s refund? Will you invest it back into your home?

Source: Paint Quality Institute

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: