RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

What Can Homeowners Do to Prevent the Spread of Zika?

May 4, 2016 2:48 am

Mounting concern over Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses has yet to motivate homeowners to take preventative measures, recent reports show, despite the urgency of the outbreak.

“Unlike Chikungunya and West Nile virus, Zika has been identified as a world health crisis,” says Scott Zide, co-founder of Mosquito Squad. “Removal of standing water is the most essential tactic in mosquito elimination, yet homeowners aren’t actively removing it, which is surprising given mosquito concerns are so high.

“Although Zika has yet to be transmitted by mosquitoes in the U.S., public health experts do expect that it soon will,” Zide adds, “and we're encouraging homeowners to walk their yards to check for ways to eliminate mosquitoes.”

Zide recommends these tips:

Stretch tarps taut. If you have items on your property covered by tarps, ensure they are stretched taut with bungee cords to eliminate the possibility of water accumulating. Inspect tarps over boats, grills, firewood piles, recycling cans and sports equipment, especially.

Toss any debris, including lawn clippings, leaves and twigs. Debris of any size can provide a prime breeding spot.

Tip over anything the collects or holds water. Since mosquitoes breed in standing water, dumping the water decreases their breeding ground. Yards with bird baths, catch basins, play sets, portable fire pits or fireplaces and tree houses are the most common collectors.

Turn over anything that holds water or trash. Items such as empty pots, light fixtures, pet bowls, plastic toys, plant saucers, portable sandboxes, or slides should be turned over or removed, if possible, to reduce risk.

Treat your home. A professional mosquito elimination barrier treatment around the home and yard can reduce the need for a DEET-containing spray.

Take care of your home. Regularly assess and clean out gutters, ensuring downspouts are attached properly. Frequently check irrigation systems for leaks, and keep your lawn trimmed and weed-free.

Talk to your neighbors. Homes in proximity to others, like those in developments or townhomes, may be at risk more so than those with more acreage. Discuss your concerns with your neighbors, and offer to assist with mosquito-repelling tasks as needed.

Source: Mosquito Squad

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tornado Watch? 8 Safety Tips for Homeowners

May 4, 2016 2:48 am

Tornadoes threaten the safety of millions of homeowners, as well as damage to property, each year. Residents of areas in the path of the twister must be proactive ahead of its touch-down, starting with the following steps, courtesy of the Red Cross:

1. Build a disaster kit with enough supplies for at least three days. This kit should include:

• Battery-Powered or Hand-Crank Radio
• Copies of Important Documents
• Extra Batteries
• First-Aid Kit
• Flashlight
• Medications
• Multi-Purpose Tool
• Non-Perishable Food
• Sanitation/Hygiene Items
• Water

2. Develop an emergency plan in which each person knows how to reach other members of the household. Include an out-of-area emergency contact person in the plan, and designate a meeting area should you be unable to return home.

3. Select a safe room, preferably a basement, storm cellar or other window-less interior room on the lowest floor. Be sure all members of the household are aware of its location.

4. Move outdoor structures, such as hanging plants, lawn furniture or trash cans, inside to prevent wind-caused damage.

5. Watch for signs of a pending storm, such as darkening skies, green-ish clouds, hail and wind. If you can hear thunder, you may be at risk for lightning damage. Remember: If thunder roars, head indoors.

6. Know your community’s warning system, and be alert for its signals. Stay abreast of the latest information regarding the storm by listening to a NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Weather Radio or your local news.

When a tornado hits:

• Go to the designated safe room, or an underground shelter. If you live in a mobile home, go to the nearest sturdy building. Do not seek shelter in the mobile home’s bathroom or hallway.

• If caught outdoors, seek shelter in a vehicle. Buckle your seat belt and try driving to the nearest sturdy building. Keep your head down below the windows, if possible. If you can, drive to an area lower than the level of the roadway, exit the vehicle and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.

For more tornado safety tips, visit the Red Cross online at www.RedCross.org.
 
Source: American Red Cross

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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