RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Report: Retirees Happy "Just Getting By"

May 4, 2016 2:48 am

Despite economic progress, many retirees are still feeling the aftershocks of the recession—but that hasn’t dampened their spirits.

“Many American retirees are still recovering from the Great Recession while managing their households with modest retirement incomes,” explains Catherine Collinson, president of the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® (TCRS), which recently released a “State of Retirement” compendium. “The good news is that most retirees are enjoying life, but the concerning news is that many may be ill-equipped to deal with a financial shock, such as the possible need for long-term care.

“As a society, we frequently speak of the need for workers to save and prepare for retirement,” Collinson continues. “Unfortunately, the conversation often ends once people stop working and retire, which is when it becomes even more critical for them to have a financial plan that can last their lifetimes.”

Over one-third of retirees included in the TCRS compendium have only “somewhat” recovered from the recession—a finding reflected in the “just getting by” mentality prevalent in the report. Other financial priorities cited in the compendium include paying off a mortgage, saving for retirement and paying off credit card debt.

Retirees today are living on a modest income: a median of $32,000, according to the TCRS compendium. Social Security is the top source of retirement income, followed by savings and investments, company-funded pension plans, and 401(k)s, 403(b)s and IRAs. Most retirees began collecting Social Security benefits at 62 years old.

Still, current retirees expect a long retirement, filled with meaningful activities outside of employment. These include spending time with family and friends, pursuing hobbies, traveling, volunteering and caring for grandchildren.

Overall, the vast majority of retirees included in the compendium are “generally happy,” “enjoying life,” and “have a strong sense of purpose.”

Source: Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What Can Homeowners Do to Prevent the Spread of Zika?

May 4, 2016 2:48 am

Mounting concern over Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses has yet to motivate homeowners to take preventative measures, recent reports show, despite the urgency of the outbreak.

“Unlike Chikungunya and West Nile virus, Zika has been identified as a world health crisis,” says Scott Zide, co-founder of Mosquito Squad. “Removal of standing water is the most essential tactic in mosquito elimination, yet homeowners aren’t actively removing it, which is surprising given mosquito concerns are so high.

“Although Zika has yet to be transmitted by mosquitoes in the U.S., public health experts do expect that it soon will,” Zide adds, “and we're encouraging homeowners to walk their yards to check for ways to eliminate mosquitoes.”

Zide recommends these tips:

Stretch tarps taut. If you have items on your property covered by tarps, ensure they are stretched taut with bungee cords to eliminate the possibility of water accumulating. Inspect tarps over boats, grills, firewood piles, recycling cans and sports equipment, especially.

Toss any debris, including lawn clippings, leaves and twigs. Debris of any size can provide a prime breeding spot.

Tip over anything the collects or holds water. Since mosquitoes breed in standing water, dumping the water decreases their breeding ground. Yards with bird baths, catch basins, play sets, portable fire pits or fireplaces and tree houses are the most common collectors.

Turn over anything that holds water or trash. Items such as empty pots, light fixtures, pet bowls, plastic toys, plant saucers, portable sandboxes, or slides should be turned over or removed, if possible, to reduce risk.

Treat your home. A professional mosquito elimination barrier treatment around the home and yard can reduce the need for a DEET-containing spray.

Take care of your home. Regularly assess and clean out gutters, ensuring downspouts are attached properly. Frequently check irrigation systems for leaks, and keep your lawn trimmed and weed-free.

Talk to your neighbors. Homes in proximity to others, like those in developments or townhomes, may be at risk more so than those with more acreage. Discuss your concerns with your neighbors, and offer to assist with mosquito-repelling tasks as needed.

Source: Mosquito Squad

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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