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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Summer Safety Tips for the Whole Family

June 30, 2017 2:30 am

We all want to have fun this summer. But between bike rides, pool parties, fireworks and sun exposure, there is a slew of safety concerns to keep in mind while navigating the summer with your family. Below are a handful of family safety tips from the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation.

Diving do’s and dont’s. Before you dive into the pool, make sure the depth of the water is nine feet or deeper. Even if the depth is acceptable for diving, there are other factors that can impede a safe dive. If there is no diving board or you have been consuming alcohol, do not dive into the pool. And of course, do not run around the pool deck, as it is slippery and can lead to a dangerous fall.

On a boat? If you are exploring the open waters in a boat, make sure to stay a safe distance from other boats and follow the speed limit. Along with standard safety precautions, keep in mind that one should jump feet first off the boat rather than diving.

Splash sports. As for water sports and activities, always stay alert to what is going on around you. When body surfing, try to keep the board extended past your head.

Bikers, beware. A bike ride is the perfect way to get some exercise and relax, but it is important to wear a helmet when you ride. Your mother's old, cracked helmet is not suitable for proper protection. Always replace your helmet if you've had it for more than five years, and make sure it is level and fits snugly to your head.

Rules of the road. Motor vehicle accidents contribute to more than 35 percent of spinal cord injuries in the United States, so it is vital to stay alert when driving and not let any distractions get in the way. Regardless of what your passengers are saying or what texts are popping up on your cell phone screen, you should not let either take your eyes or focus off the road. Also, make sure your seatbelt is on properly, along with the other passengers, who should all be in their appropriate size seat.

Source: The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Understanding the Serious Nature of Mini-Strokes

June 30, 2017 2:30 am

(Family Features)--Knowing the warning signs of a mini-stroke could help save a life.

A survey conducted by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association shows one-third of United States adults have had symptoms consistent with a transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a mini-stroke, but only 3 percent called 911 for help.

"Ignoring any stroke signs could be a deadly mistake," says Mitch Elkind, M.D., chair of the American Stroke Association Advisory Committee. "Only a formal medical diagnosis with brain imaging can determine whether you're having a TIA or a stroke."

The survey showed 35 percent of respondents experienced at least one sign of a TIA or mini-stroke, such as sudden trouble speaking or a severe headache with no known cause. According to the online survey, those who suffered symptoms were more likely to wait it out, rest or take medicine rather than call 911.

Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability in the United States and among the top five causes of death. However, with proper, timely medical attention, stroke is largely treatable. The faster you are treated, the more likely you are to have a positive outcome.

The American Stroke Association's Together to End Stroke initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic, teaches the acronym F.A.S.T. to help people remember the most common stroke warning signs and what to do in a stroke emergency:

F - Face drooping

A - Arm weakness

S - Speech difficulty

T - Time to call 911

While the symptoms are the same, the difference between a TIA and a stroke is that the blockage is temporary, lasting between a few minutes and 24 hours. People who suffer a TIA, sometimes called a warning stroke, are more likely to have a stroke within 90 days, according to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Elkind says anyone who experiences a stroke warning sign that appears suddenly, whether it goes away or not, should call 911 immediately. This could improve the chances of an accurate diagnosis, treatment and recovery.
Stroke symptoms come on suddenly with no known cause and may include confusion, trouble speaking or understanding; weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body; trouble seeing in one or both eyes; trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination; or a severe headache.

Source: StrokeAssociation.org.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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