RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Study: Home Loan Shopping Takes Backseat to Car Buying

May 16, 2016 1:18 am

House hunters spend a lot of time researching homes—but not many spend time researching home loans.

Recent Zillow survey findings show Americans spend an average of eight hours researching loans, including refinancing, attaining an average of four quotes, versus the average 26 hours spent researching homes themselves.

At nine hours, millennials—likely first-time homebuyers—spend the most time researching loans; baby boomers spend eight hours, and those in Generation X spend seven, according to survey results.

Millennials are more likely to compare mortgage rates than older generations: 85 percent of those included in the survey shopped around for a loan, compared to 75 percent of Generation X shoppers and 55 percent of boomers. They are also more likely to seek out more quotes from lenders—six, on average.

The survey also finds boomers spend the most time researching a home (32 hours) and spend the most time researching major and minor home improvement projects (nine hours and five hours, respectively).

Comparatively, when it comes to researching a car purchase, millennial and Generation X shoppers spend an average of 11 hours, and boomers spend an average of 12 hours—all told, an average three hours less than the average time spent researching a home loan.

For homebuyers and refinancers, it’s important to keep in mind that you may work with the lender of your choosing, though your real estate professional may offer recommendations.

Source: Zillow

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Home on the Market? Tips for a Landscape That Sells

May 16, 2016 1:18 am

Beautifully-appointed outdoor spaces are not just a perk for today’s homebuyers—they’re expected. Landscaping, in particular, can make all the difference in selling price, according to the Appraisal Institute.

Citing two studies, the Institute shares these findings:

• Manicured landscaping can raise a home’s value by as much as 11 percent. (Michigan State University)

• Eighty-five percent of Americans believe landscaping affects the decision to buy a home. (National Association of Landscape Professionals)

While the quality of the lawn is an important consideration, the Institute recommends sellers also give due to flower beds and porches, with an eye for what’s most popular in the neighborhood.

Consider incorporating landscaping that spares the new owner money or time, such as trees or native plantings—features that could potentially increase perceived value, the Institute says. Trees indirectly reduce energy consumption, and native plantings do not require the same scope of care as other species.

Lighting is also important, the Institute advises, because it can enhance a home’s appearance (thereby, perceived value), as well as heighten the safety of the home.

“Just as job seekers shouldn’t show up improperly attired for a job interview, sellers need to ensure their property is as attractive from the outside as possible,” says Appraisal Institute President Scott Robinson. “First impressions matter.”

Source: The Appraisal Institute

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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