RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Kitchen Renovation: Floor Function

January 29, 2018 1:09 am

(Family Features)--Whether designing a brand new kitchen or renovating your existing one, there are many elements to consider, and the floor should not be the last. Giving special attention to the material composition of your kitchen, particularly when it comes to the aspects that take the heaviest use - the floors, sink and countertops - can help ensure your renovation stands the test of time.

Though often taken for granted, the floor is generally the kitchen feature that sustains the heaviest use over time. Whether your tastes tend toward tile, wood or another option altogether, there are still numerous variables to explore.

Tile is an excellent choice for the kitchen because it stands up well to the heavy traffic and spills common in that space. However, tile can also be slippery and can be uncomfortable if you spend long amounts of time on your feet in the kitchen. Ceramic tile is the easiest to install but not as resistant to damage as porcelain or stone tile.

The latter options require more skilled installation, and stone especially tends to be more expensive. You'll also need to pay attention to factors like water resistance and texture, both of which affect safety and how easily the floors can be cleaned.

When it comes to wood, one of the first decisions is whether you prefer engineered or solid hardwood.

Engineered versions tend to offer greater durability and flexibility in installation while the texture and appearance of solid hardwood are its strongest appeals. Other variables include the wood type, which further affects the look and strength. Oak is most common, but other traditional selections include options like maple or cherry and specialty woods like teak or bamboo. Plank width influences overall aesthetic, with slimmer boards lending a more modern look. Color is also a consideration, as you'll need to determine whether you want to match, complement or contrast your cabinetry.

If something a little less traditional is more your speed, an option like foot-friendly cork or a modern take on vinyl may be more to your liking.

Source: Kohler

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Having a Party? Prep the Plumbing

January 29, 2018 1:09 am

If you're getting ready to host a house full of people, you're likely focusing on a zillion details, from food to home staging, music and more. But have you thought about your pipes? The professionals at Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® recommend party hosts and guests follow these precautions to avoid common plumbing mishaps and help ensure fans can stay focused on the game:

Be mindful of what food goes down the garbage disposal. Fats, bones and vegetable peels can clog drains and damage the disposal. Rice and pasta can swell and clog the drain, as well. As a good rule of thumb, always toss scraps in the trashcan when it's possible.

Always use water when running the disposal. The garbage disposal works best when small particles are mixed with water. Use hot water down the disposal to keep grease moving down the drain, and run water for at least 30 seconds after everything has cleared.

Know what to do if the garbage disposal becomes clogged. If your disposal becomes clogged, turn it off, and shut off the water. Don't reach into a disposal, and never, ever use harsh chemicals to treat a clog. Instead, try a plunger.

Educate guests on what can and cannot go down the toilet. Commonly flushed items that may clog your pipes include napkins, paper towels, facial tissues and feminine products. Keep a trashcan near the toilet and remind guests to please only flush toilet paper down the commode.

Inform guests of any existing plumbing issues. For example, if the toilet handle needs a little jiggle in order to flush, spread the word and post a sign in the bathroom as a constant reminder.

Source: Benjamin Franklin Plumbing®

Published with permission from RISMedia.