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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Staying Put? How to Prepare to Age-in-Place

June 24, 2016 12:33 am

​Many older homeowners are set on staying in their homes as they age—“aging-in-place.”

To stay put successfully, preparation is key, according to Corey Carlisle, executive director of the American Bankers Association (ABA) Foundation.

“Older Americans make up the largest share of homeowners in the country,” said Carlisle in a statement. “In order for them to stay in their homes as they age, families and caregivers must plan ahead to ensure the elderly have all the resources they need to be safe, independent and financially secure.”

To start, Carlisle and the ABA Foundation recommend recruiting loved ones, or even a banker, to assess your finances. How long can you comfortably afford your current home? Will you need to budget for aging-in-place improvements? Will you require in-home care? Consider these questions as you evaluate your financial longevity.

A reverse mortgage is an important consideration—one that must be researched thoroughly. The ABA Foundation suggests visiting ReverseMortgage.org to comparison-shop for lenders and rates, and visiting HUD.gov to locate a reverse mortgage counselor in your area, before committing to a loan.

Size up your current home to see what modifications will likely be needed, and financially prepare to make them. Aging-in-place upgrades can include anything from handrails and no-slip flooring to a stair lift or ramp entrance—and, they can be as simple as placing an emergency contact list in plain view at home, according to the ABA Foundation.

After you’ve established a viable aging-in-place plan, conduct six-month check-ins going forward, the ABA Foundation advises. Revisiting your plan periodically will help you better adapt to the inevitable changes of aging.

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Stay Safe While on Summer Vacation

June 23, 2016 2:30 am

Summer vacation is the time to unwind—but that doesn’t mean we should overlook safety.

Incidents can and do happen on vacations, says Jeffrey Pellegrino, member of the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council.

“Prevention is the key to avoiding accidents or illness while on vacation,” Pellegrino says. “It's important to know the level of ability of the people in your group and the environment around you. Know what injuries are life-threatening and understand that small injuries can lead to bigger issues if they are not properly cared for.”

Dehydration, for instance, can happen no matter where you’re traveling, Pellegrino explains. Sprains are one of the most common incidents on cruises, whereas those traveling to the mountains may be more prone to falls. In general, Pellegrino advises travelers to tote remedies like a first-aid kit, bug spray, medications and tweezers.

If a loved one on vacation with you experiences a non-life-threatening allergic reaction, administer an oral antihistamine, Pellegrino recommends. For life-threatening reactions, epinephrine is essential.

If you’ve spent too much time in the sun, move to a cooler area as soon as possible. If needed, apply a topical to abate pain, Pellegrino says. If you’ve been bitten by an insect, use an over-the-counter medication to curb the sensation of burning or itching. If you’ve been stung by a jellyfish, wash the wound with vinegar or baking soda and water for at least 30 seconds.

It’s worth considering becoming first-aid- or CPR-certified, Pellegrino adds. Red Cross provides both in-person and online training. Sign up at RedCross.org/TakeaClass.

Source: American Red Cross

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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