RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Curb Appeal: Tips to Polish Up Paint

May 24, 2016 1:36 am

In life and in real estate, first impressions matter. Before placing your home on the market, it’s worth taking a look at the paint on the outside, which may have been impacted by elements from the past winter.

“If you’ve been huddled inside for the past few months, you may not be aware of the price your exterior paint has paid keeping winter weather at bay,” says Debbie Zimmer, paint and color expert with the paint Quality Institute. “Freeze-thaw cycles, rain, sleet and snow can cause paint to fail quickly, especially if you didn't use top-quality paint to begin with.”

Zimmer suggests starting by inspecting for flaking or peeling paint on the exterior siding and trim. If the compromised paint is confined to a small area, a touch-up may be all that’s needed.

Begin any touch-up project by scraping off loose paint, then sanding the edges smooth, Zimmer explains. Next, prime any areas where bare wood is visible, and then apply a coat of leftover paint.

If the paint damage is beyond touch-up repair, Zimmer advises re-painting the home sooner rather than later.

“Assuming that you're a do-it-yourself painter, you'll find it much more comfortable to do your surface preparation and painting now, when the weather is mild,” Zimmer says. “Your paint may even last longer if you act quickly.  Exterior paints tend to 'cure' better in moderate temperatures, which enables them to form an especially durable paint film.”

It’s doubly important to act fast if you plan to hire a painter, Zimmer adds. Professionals tend to book up this time of year.

No matter which route you choose, don’t skimp on the product—it will make all the difference.

“A top-quality 100-percent acrylic latex paint will provide the best-looking and longest-lasting results, no matter where it is used,” Zimmer says.

Source: Paint Quality Institute

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Your Property: Avoiding Tree Care Cons

May 23, 2016 1:36 am

Healthy, mature trees can be a benefit to your home and property. Aside from their beauty, trees offer shade, helping to naturally regulate your home’s indoor temperature, and may even absorb harmful gasses.

Caring for the trees on your property, according to the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), is best left to a professional. Because many home-related scams involve tree care companies, the Association recommends vetting out potential hires.

Knowledge is key. An arborist is defined by the Association as “a professional who cares for trees and other woody plants by pruning, fertilizing, monitoring for insects and diseases, and consulting on tree-related issues, and occasionally planting, transplanting and removing trees.”

“With hundreds and possibly thousands of dollars at stake—not to mention the integrity and appearance of your property and your personal safety—make sure that you take your time in deciding which company you should hire,” cautions Peter Gerstenberger, senior advisor for Safety, Standards & Compliance for the TCIA.

Gerstenberger advises first seeking out up-to-date proof of insurance from potential hires. If the company does not have insurance, you may be held responsible for any future claims.

“Disreputable companies are renowned for ripping gutters off, breaking fences and bird baths, and even dropping trees on houses. Then they typically fold up and leave, never to be seen again,” Gertsenberger says.

Always, always get estimates in writing, as well as a second (or third) opinion and quote. Do not feel pressured by bogus “bargains” or pay-upfront schemes.

During the screening process, request local references. Don’t hesitate to assess workmanship, and verify any professional affiliations the company claims to have. This may include the TCIA, Gertsenberger adds.

Bear in mind reputable tree care companies generally follow ANSI Standards. Confirm this information with potential hires before signing a contract. When you settle on a company, be sure the contract includes dates, cost and detailed descriptions of the work to be performed.

If you believe you’ve been victimized in a tree care scam, report the incident to your state’s Attorney General’s office, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) or the FBI, says Gertsenberger.

Source: TCIA

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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