RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Lawn Care Tips That Lessen Your Carbon Footprint

May 25, 2016 1:36 am

Did you know the average gas-powered lawn mower emits over four tons of carbon and other pollutants each year?

That’s according to MowGreen, a carbon neutral company focused on sustainable lawn care. That four tons of carbon, MowGreen founder Dan Delventhal says, is equivalent to the emissions of a car driven 10,000 miles!

Delventhal recommends nixing the gas-guzzling machine in favor of a push mower, which not only lessens the user’s carbon footprint, but has health benefits, as well. Every 1,000 acres mowed without gas-powered equipment offsets four million auto mile-equivalent emissions, Delventhal says.

Aside from the switch to a push mower, homeowners may also want to overhaul their lawn care program, particularly weed control.

Corn gluten, Delventhal explains, is effective for weed control, but must be managed with proper timing. It is reputed to be 90 percent effective for weed control when applied in spring, fall and spring again. It suppresses new weed growth in spring and fall by desiccation, shunting new seed germination, as well as through a protein-type reaction that inhibits the growth of broad-leaf weeds.

Corn gluten is also a nitrogen fertilizer, and, when combined with weed control application, can replace fertilizing entirely, says Delventhal.

Use certified non-GMO, organic corn gluten, if available. Delventhal’s own corn gluten costs $75 for a 50-pound bag, which covers about 2,500 square feet. The price comes down as the quantity increases.

Want to learn more? Visit MowGreen.us for tips.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Owning in Retirement: 3 Options for Senior Homeowners

May 25, 2016 1:36 am

(BPT)—Research estimates more than 50 percent of households lack enough retirement funds to maintain their pre-retirement standard of living—even if they work until 65.

The good news? If you’re a homeowner, you have options:

Reverse Mortgage – A reverse mortgage is a loan that homeowners aged 62 or older can use to convert part of the equity in their home into a usable asset, without giving up title or ownership of the house.

“The reverse mortgage option should be viewed as a method for responsible retirees to create liquidity from an otherwise illiquid asset,” says Wade Pfau, professor at The American College.

Reverse mortgages require no monthly payment and do not have to be paid off until the last borrower permanently leaves the home. You have the option of taking the loan proceeds as a lump sum, a fixed monthly or tenured payment, or as a line of credit.

Reverse mortgages also feature a non-recourse provision that protects you from ever owing the lender more than the value of your home, even if the house is "underwater" when you are ready to sell.

You are still responsible for paying your property taxes, homeowner's insurance and upkeep expenses, or risk the loan being called due and payable.

Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) – A HELOC establishes a line of credit based on a percentage of the value of your home. You can access this credit during a predetermined amount of time called a "draw period," usually 10 years. During the draw period, you can borrow up to the designated amount while making monthly interest payments, and, if you choose to pay back on the principal, you can draw out again, much like a credit card.

After the draw period, you are responsible for repaying the principal and interest either immediately or over a set period of time, depending on the terms of the loan. You should be aware that if your home value depreciates, or if your financial circumstances change, the lender has the right to freeze your credit or even cancel your loan.

Cash-Out Refinancing – Cash-out refinancing allows you to refinance an existing home loan—hopefully at a lower interest rate—and also refinance the home for a dollar value higher than the remaining principal. This loan allows you to keep the money above the principal as liquid cash that can be used to pay down other expenses or fund your retirement.

Like your original forward mortgage, if you miss a monthly payment due to unanticipated expenses from a health care emergency or other life disruption, your loan could be called due and payable, and the lender could move to foreclose on your property.

While all three plans have their benefits, new consumer safeguards for reverse mortgages are fueling their popularity among seniors who want the benefit of no monthly payment, a loan that can't be canceled or reset, and the option of a line of credit that increases over time.

Source: ReverseMortgage.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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