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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

8 Things Not to Do in an Airplane

June 30, 2017 2:30 am

Flying is often not fun these days, but these tips from Reader’s Digest may help make your next flight a bit more pleasant:

Don’t neglect skin care – Pressurized air is very dry. Moisturizing before a flight will guard against parched, itchy skin – and the sunblock in most moisturizers will protect against the radiation one study says is commonplace in aircraft interiors.

Don’t fall asleep before take-off – If you do, it will be harder for you to equalize the pressure in your ears. Hold off on your snooze until your ears pop.

Don’t close the air vent – Recirculated air may not be fresh, but doctors suggest that leaving the vent open keeps germs from lingering in your personal space.

Don’t order coffee or tea – A study by the Environmental Protection Agency said 12 percent of airplanes carry water that tested positive for bacteria. Since heating doesn’t fully kill bacteria, it may be best to skip that hot drink.

Or guzzle a soda – Increased altitude may cause intestinal gas to expand up to 30 percent. If you have a sensitive stomach, choose water over a carbonated drink.

Watch out for the seat-back tray – Studies show it’s the most bacteria-laden surface on the plane – even more so than the lavatory flush button. Clean it with an antibacterial wipe before using it – and don’t rest food or snacks directly on it.

Don’t sit for the entire flight – Sitting in one place for more than four hours can slow your circulation and may put you at increased risk for blood clots. Walk up and down the aisle every once in awhile or exercise your legs while seated  by flexing your feet, ankles and knees.

There are ways to avoid the middle seat – If you’re stuck with one and hate being stuck between strangers, sign up for free alerts at expertflyer.com. Enter your flight number to be notified when a better seat pops up. Then you can go to the airline’s website and change your seat assignment.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Summer Safety Tips for the Whole Family

June 30, 2017 2:30 am

We all want to have fun this summer. But between bike rides, pool parties, fireworks and sun exposure, there is a slew of safety concerns to keep in mind while navigating the summer with your family. Below are a handful of family safety tips from the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation.

Diving do’s and dont’s. Before you dive into the pool, make sure the depth of the water is nine feet or deeper. Even if the depth is acceptable for diving, there are other factors that can impede a safe dive. If there is no diving board or you have been consuming alcohol, do not dive into the pool. And of course, do not run around the pool deck, as it is slippery and can lead to a dangerous fall.

On a boat? If you are exploring the open waters in a boat, make sure to stay a safe distance from other boats and follow the speed limit. Along with standard safety precautions, keep in mind that one should jump feet first off the boat rather than diving.

Splash sports. As for water sports and activities, always stay alert to what is going on around you. When body surfing, try to keep the board extended past your head.

Bikers, beware. A bike ride is the perfect way to get some exercise and relax, but it is important to wear a helmet when you ride. Your mother's old, cracked helmet is not suitable for proper protection. Always replace your helmet if you've had it for more than five years, and make sure it is level and fits snugly to your head.

Rules of the road. Motor vehicle accidents contribute to more than 35 percent of spinal cord injuries in the United States, so it is vital to stay alert when driving and not let any distractions get in the way. Regardless of what your passengers are saying or what texts are popping up on your cell phone screen, you should not let either take your eyes or focus off the road. Also, make sure your seatbelt is on properly, along with the other passengers, who should all be in their appropriate size seat.

Source: The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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