RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

What Not to Pack for Your Next Vacation

August 17, 2016 2:12 am


Airlines have begun charging for checked bags, travel security measures have tightened… what’s a vacationer to do?

A carry-on bag is your best bet—but if you’re traveling for a week or more, packing just a carry-on may seem impossible. Turns out, you can travel light and still have everything you need for a vacation, says Rick Seaney, CEO of FareCompare.com. Here, his top picks for what not to pack:

A Third Pair of Shoes – For most trips, you can get away with a pair of sneakers and one pair of walking shoes nice enough to be worn to dinner. If you must have more, make the third pair lightweight flip-flops.

Banned Liquids – You know you can’t bring bottled water through security, but remember that shampoos, lotions, sunscreens, etc., must be in bottles no more than 3.4 ounces.

Excess Equipment – Blow dryers can be found at even the most modest motels, and forget electric curlers or straighteners— you won’t want to spend so much time on your hair, anyway!

Expensive Items – Valuables are a target for thieves, and bags or purses can easily be lost or rummaged through. If you must take an expensive item, wear it—and if you bring an electronic device, keep it on your person at all times.

More Clothes Than You Need – Make a wish list of outfits you want, then cut it in half. Know the weather in your destination, and be prepared to layer as needed.

Old-Style Entertainment – Free up space by leaving books, especially hard-covers, as well as radios and flashlights, at home.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Share and Separate: Remodeling for Multigenerational Living

August 17, 2016 2:12 am


(BPT)—Multigenerational households are becoming more and more common, as extended family members move to live under one roof for cultural, financial or personal reasons.

While multigenerational living has its advantages, a lack of space can be a challenge. One of the best ways to remedy it is to remodel the home with separation in mind. Converting an existing space—such as a basement, garage or guest suite—into living space for one generation, or compartmentalizing, is ideal.

To compartmentalize effectively, each generational space must have, at minimum, a kitchenette, a bathroom, and living and sleeping areas. Make special consideration when it comes to installing plumbing in the kitchenette and bathroom—some spaces simply cannot accommodate in-ground or in-wall fixtures, and an above-floor, compact system may be necessary.

Setting up shared spaces is equally important when remodeling for multigenerational living. Consider the activities the whole family enjoys—Sunday brunch, crafts, or movie night, for example. Factor these into the remodeling plans, and ensure the areas that support these are accessible from the generational compartments.

The number of multigenerational households is expected to continue growing, as boomers enter their golden years and millennials strive to establish homes. Remodeling for both separation and shared spaces increases the functionality of the home, fostering what ultimately matters most: time with family.

Source: Saniflo
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: