RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Minor Aging-in-Place Improvements with Major Impact

June 1, 2016 1:42 am

Remaining in the home you currently own when retiring has its advantages, but only if it’s outfitted to accommodate your needs as you age. One aging-in-place feature crucial to longevity in the home is adequate lighting.

Vision issues brought on by age, like cataracts or macular degeneration, can make living in a poorly-lit home challenging. Because artificial light may exacerbate these conditions, increasing the home’s level of natural light is the best course of action. In fact, according to the Center for Health Design, natural light can help regulate your sleep cycle, boost your mood and facilitate bodily processes.

To increase the natural light your home receives, consider:

Ditching Drapes – Replace thick, heavy drapes with cordless or remote-operated blinds—ideal for those with limited dexterity. Use them to maximize the amount of natural light entering the home during the day.

Installing Skylights – ENERGY STAR-qualified skylights not only provide natural light, but also increase passive ventilation. A skylight can be especially beneficial in the kitchen, where visual acuity is critical. Most skylights are eligible for the 30 percent federal tax credit.

Repainting – Repaint the rooms you use most often with lighter, vision-friendly colors. Look for paint products that minimize glare, with a Light Reflectance Value (LVR) in the 40-60 range.

These minor improvements can have major impact on your enjoyment of the home in the years to come.

If aging-in-place isn’t part of your plans, reach out to your local real estate professional. He or she can help you downsize (or move-up!) come retirement.

Source: Brandpoint

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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What Every College Grad Should Know About That First Job

May 31, 2016 1:42 am

Each year, scores of college grads hit the streets in search of their first job. Before you (or a recently graduated loved one) start pounding the pavement, get ahead of these hard facts, according to Yahoo! Finance.

Credit card debt is a killer.
You may find yourself bombarded with (and tempted by!) credit card offers after receiving your first few paychecks. Carrying credit card debt comes with high interest, and, often, stress. Don’t risk ruining your credit before you’ve established your independence. Charge no more in any month than you can reasonably pay off when the bill arrives.

Your boss is not your friend.
It’s great to have a boss you like, and even better when the feeling is mutual, but remember: your boss’s top priority isn’t you. It’s bottom-line company performance, so mind your p’s and q’s and remember that your job evaluation is worth more than a pat on the head.

Save more than you think you can afford.
Putting off saving “until later” can cost you thousands of dollars long-term. Don’t put off investing in your future. Make saving a priority. Take advantage of company savings options, if possible.

It’s okay to quit.
Few first jobs turn out to be the opportunity you expected.  Statistics show the average young adult has had seven jobs by the time they reach 30. Don’t be hasty. The idea is not to burn bridges, but to build them. Learn whatever you can from every job, and take those new skills with you to the next.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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