RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Household Products Wasting Your Money

June 6, 2016 2:03 am

Household products account for a portion of almost everyone’s shopping list. You can save money by making smart choices about the products and services you buy, says consumer editor Nikelle Murphy of CheatSheet.com—in fact, there are at least five common household products you can strike from your list:

1. Air Fresheners – Air fresheners are a multibillion-dollar industry. If you’re concerned about pet, cooking or other household odors, leave a bowl or two of baking soda on the counter, or sprinkle it into smelly shoes or on your carpet. Leave it in the bowls overnight, or vacuum it up after letting it sit for a while. The sodium bicarbonate in baking soda reacts with acidic odors and absorbs them.

2. Extended Warranties – Most manufacturers provide a warranty that covers any short-term issues you may encounter with their products—and retailers who sell extended warranties keep at least half of the proceeds. Except for a car, or perhaps a laptop, most extended warranties are a waste of money.

3. K-Cups and Coffee Pods – Coffee pods and K-Cups may be convenient when you want only one cup of coffee, but using them regularly will cost you five times more than one bag of home-brewable Starbucks coffee. They are also non-biodegradable, making them a poorer choice for the planet.

4. Paper Towels – Not only are paper towels harmful to the environment, but they are also far more costly than using rags or washcloths to clean up messes. Tear up fraying towels or an old jersey sheet and keep the rags handy. Toss them in the wash with the rest of the whites and save yourself a lot of cash.

5. Robotic Vacuum Cleaners – Robotic vacuum cleaners don’t save the cost of a regular vac, simply because they don’t do stairs, they lack the power of a traditional vac for heavy-duty cleaning, and they don’t navigate well around clutter. To boot, they’re expensive—between $300 and $900—and they require maintenance.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Investors: The Top Markets for Flips

June 6, 2016 2:03 am

2016: the year of the flip?

Sales of flipped single-family homes and condominiums shot up 20 percent from the quarter prior in the first quarter of this year, reaching the highest rate since the beginning of 2014 and grossing, on average, a profit of $58,250, according to a recently released RealtyTrac® report.

Markets that saw the highest share of flip activity in the first quarter, per the report, include:

• Memphis, Tenn.
• Clarksville, Tenn.
• Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Fla.
• Fresno, Calif.
• Visalia-Porterville, Calif.
• Tampa, Fla.
• Las Vegas, Nev.
• Virginia Beach, Va.
• Miami, Fla.
• Jacksonville, Fla.

Markets that saw the highest average gross profit in the first quarter, per the report, include:
 
• East Stroudsburg, Pa.
• Reading, Pa.
• Pittsburgh, Pa.
• Flint, Mich.
• New Haven, Conn.
• Philadelphia, Pa.
• New Orleans, La.
• Cincinnati, Ohio
• Buffalo, N.Y.
• Cleveland, Ohio
• Jacksonville, Fla.
• Baltimore, Md.

A flip is defined in the report as “a property that is sold in an arms-length sale for the second time within a 12-month period based on publicly recorded sales deed data collected by RealtyTrac in more than 950 counties accounting for more than 80 percent of U.S. population.” The average gross profit, as defined in the report, is “the difference between the purchase price and the flipped price (not including rehab costs and other expenses incurred, which flipping veterans estimate typically run between 20 percent and 33 percent of the property’s after repair value).”

Source: RealtyTrac®

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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