RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Remodeling Your Kitchen? Types, Layouts and More

June 10, 2016 12:12 am

Renovating your kitchen is one of the most valuable improvements you can make to your home—if done within a budget that fits the circumstances.

Generally, the price of a cost-effective kitchen remodel will be 10 to 15 percent of the overall value of the home, say the experts at Cornerstone Design and Remodel, a San Diego, Calif.-based firm. Most kitchen remodels, according to Cornerstone, fall into one of three categories:

Minor (Costing less than $15,000)
Intermediate (Costing around $40,000)
Luxury (Unlimited budget)

Minor remodels involve installing new appliances or countertops or giving the cabinets a cosmetic update. The expected return on investment, Cornerstone’s experts say, can be up to 98 percent.

Intermediate remodels fetch slightly less at resale than minor ones—up to 91 percent of the cost of the project, the experts at Cornerstone say. Intermediate projects might include installing brand new cabinetry and flooring.

Luxury remodeling projects tend to exceed their initial budget, in part due to the cost of high-end finishes, products and technology. While the final result will be appreciated by the current homeowner, a buyer may not be willing to pay for it come resale, so exercise caution, the Cornerstone experts say.

Some kitchen remodels, luxury or otherwise, also involve changing the structure or layout of the room. In this case, it is best to scale the expansion to match the rest of the house, according to Cornerstone. The most common layouts for kitchens are L-shape, U-shape and galley. L-shaped kitchens generally include an island in the design; U-shaped and galley kitchens are efficient workspaces, but galley kitchens can become congested if the flow of traffic through it is heavy.

However you decide to renovate your kitchen, keep in mind the next owner will want to enjoy as much as you will, the experts at Cornerstone add. Efficiency in the design will achieve just that.

Source: Cornerstone Design and Remodel

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Sun Safety: 3 Myths Debunked

June 9, 2016 2:09 am

For all the talk of the dangers of the sun, many of us fail to protect ourselves from one of the most common sun-caused conditions: sunburn.

Why haven’t we taken better precautions?

According to a recently released survey by The Merck Manuals, most sunbathers rely on misinformation—myths about sun protection that, when adhered to, can lead to potentially devastating consequences.

The Merck Manuals recently consulted with Dr. Karen McKoy, of the Lahey Clinic Medical Center’s Department of Dermatology, to disprove the most common misconceptions:

Misconception: “I need sunlight to get enough Vitamin D.”

Results from The Merck Manuals survey show 62 percent of respondents believe sun exposure is vital to maintaining healthy Vitamin D levels. While the sun does provide Vitamin D, the exposure is not worth the health risks, Dr. McKoy says. Seek out other sources of Vitamin D, whether through food or through a supplement.

Misconception: “I have on sunscreen with a high SPF, so my skin will be protected longer.”

Forty-four percent of survey respondents falsely believe a higher SPF will protect them from the sun for an extended period of time. Dr. McKoy advises reapplying sunscreen at least every two hours while outside, and to avoid the sun, if possible, between late morning and early afternoon.

Another similar misconception: higher SPF numbers equal higher protection. This is incorrect—an SPF 30 sunscreen, for example, bars 97 percent of the sun’s rays, and an SPF 15 sunscreen blocks just 4 percent less than that, even though the SPF 30 appears to be double the SPF 15.

Misconception: “If I’m covered up when swimming, I won’t get sunburn.”

Thirty percent of survey respondents believe a cotton T-shirt will provide sufficient protection from the sun while in water. A T-shirt does not prevent ultraviolet rays from reaching your skin while in water—and neither do baseball hats. For maximum protection in water, apply sunscreen, wear clothing with a tight weave and don a hat with a seven-centimeter brim, Dr. McKoy recommends.

One other, less common misconception of note: what we eat does impact how we react to the sun. Consuming foods like lemons, limes, carrots, celery and parsley can result in Lime Disease (formally called Phytophotodermatitis), which manifests as a rash that is exacerbated by sunlight.

Source: The Merck Manuals

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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