RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Pests on Your Property? Don't Spray Yet!

July 28, 2016 1:27 am


As a homeowner, you may be inclined to eliminate pests from your landscape at first sighting. We don’t blame you!

Most pests, however, are harmless, and in fact beneficial, to a landscape’s ecosystem. Pest-related damage, though alarming, is likely a sign that a natural process is occurring.

“A landscape without insects and microorganisms would be a very unhealthy environment,” explained Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist for the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), in a statement. “The trick is to the balance the threshold of healthy with having too much of a good thing, when the naturally-occurring insects and diseases become a problem.”

According to the TCIA, pests are one of many rungs on the ladder of the ecosystem, contributing to decomposition and other natural processes. Commercial pest removal sprays disrupt those processes.

“This is where an integrated pest management (IPM) program may benefit your landscape plants,” Andersen said.

To implement this system, the TCIA advises exercising proactive measures, such as irrigation and mulching, and consulting a tree care professional—the latter will be able to provide recommendations should pests become a problem.

“A healthy landscape is less susceptible to pest outbreaks and is more resilient if an outbreak does occur,” concluded Andersen.

Source: Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Self-Driving Cars to Transform Cities, Housing

July 28, 2016 1:27 am


Self-driving cars have made headlines as a revolutionary invention, but little has been written about their revolutionary impact—until now.

According to a recently released report by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), the preponderance of self-driving vehicles (SDVs) could result in less accidents, less pollution and less traffic in urban centers brimming with commuters.

“There is a compelling case to be made for SDVs in cities,” said Nikolaus Lang, co-author of the report, which postulates that cities will be irrevocably altered by the self-driving car, in a statement. “Ride-shared, electric robo-taxis can substantially transform and improve urban transportation, and, by direct extension, livability, by providing more people with easier access to mobility, making streets safer, and freeing up space no longer needed for parking.”

The report estimates universal use of SDVs, including robo-taxis, could reduce the number of cars on city streets by 60 percent, reduce vehicle emissions by 80 percent, and reduce accidents by 90 percent.

Developments such as these are not far off, if the report’s findings bear out—58 percent of drivers in cities around the world are open to an SDV, and many are willing to pay a premium for one. The initial upfront cost, they reason, pales in comparison to the potential savings, including on gas and parking fees.

Savings could even be realized in housing, the report adds—SDVs may make it “more convenient to live farther from the expensive city core.”

Policymakers believe SDVs will soon have a transformative effect on cities, as well. Sixty percent of those included in the report expect at least one city to ban conventional car ownership by 2025.

That city, with few cars, less road incidents and minimal pollution, will serve as a paradigm for others, and a catalyst for widespread adoption, the report concludes.

Source: The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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