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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Pack Healthier Food for Your Child

August 31, 2017 1:03 am

While you can urge your child to eat healthier at home, once you send them off to school it can be difficult. But what your child eats during the day will fuel their brains for prime learning, so packing their lunch--rather than relying on the school's choices--is something you should consider.

In the following tips, Sodexo lays out ways to add balance and nutrition to school meals and snacks without sacrificing taste and enjoyment.

Think of the food groups when packing or purchasing a healthy, balanced school meal. Whether preparing meals at home or choosing meals at school, remember all foods groups play a role in creating and sustaining optimal health. These include wholesome grains, lean proteins, colorful fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods. Look to add variety to your food choices. Instead of relying only on sliced bread, try whole-grain crackers, tortilla wraps or pita bread. Dairy foods are an important source of calcium and vitamin D, and you can help your children meet their three daily servings of dairy with any combination of milk, cheese, and yogurt (single serving, drinkable or squeezable). Pack or choose cut-up fruits and sliced vegetables and enjoy with low-fat dips or portable single-serving sizes of peanut butter or hummus. For more information about food groups and balanced meal planning, check out the ChooseMyPlate educational resources.

Be sure to include a protein source. Protein is an important part of every meal because it provides a source of sustained energy.  As protein foods typically take longer to digest than carbohydrate-rich foods like grains and fruits, adding protein to meals and snacks can help students feel full longer and help them stay focused in the classroom.  And don't forget about breakfast. Consider quick and portable protein sources like peanut butter on whole-grain bread with jam (or soy nut butter or other nut butters), string cheese, hard boiled eggs or a smoothie made with milk or yogurt. Other lunch time protein choices include tuna and lean lunch meats like turkey or chicken; shredded cheese for a salad topping; cottage cheese paired with fruit; and plant-based protein sources like edamame, beans or tofu.

Find creative ways to sneak in fruits and veggies. Add veggies like cherry tomatoes, spinach, broccoli florets, or bell pepper or zucchini slices to pasta salads, or add banana slices to a peanut butter sandwich on whole-grain bread.  Use avocado as a sandwich spread and add lettuce and tomato, or try topping with shredded carrots.

Read labels when choosing treats. The USDA Healthy Hungry Free Kids Act requires schools to offer students snacks and beverages that are lower in calories, sodium and added sugars. Families can implement these same snack and beverage guidelines at home.  Think about the drink. For kids of all ages, water and milk are the best beverage choices. Besides having zero calories, water is a good way to stay hydrated throughout the school day. Milk is an important source of calcium needed to help build strong bones, and is also gaining popularity as an alternative to traditional sports beverages. Look for fat-free or low-fat milk to help manage calorie intake. If your child has a dairy allergy, consider soy milk as a dairy alternative, and be sure to read labels to compare amounts of added sugars.

Source: Sodexo

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Tips to Make Sense of Cyber Security

August 31, 2017 1:03 am

(Family Features)--It's no secret that kids have a sense of invincibility. While that trait can bring some endearing reminders of the innocence of childhood, it can also have some highly unfortunate consequences. In the context of cyber security, an action by an unknowing child can impact the entire family.

The majority of U.S. households are filled with devices that pose a potential threat to your personal security. In fact, according to the 2016 Global Consumer Security Survey by Trend Micro, nearly half of households have two or more computers and nearly a third have three or more smartphones. That means the opportunities are plentiful for missteps to occur.

Despite the many benefits of a highly connected world, the potential for danger is strong. The same study found that 65 percent of respondents' computers had been infected with a virus or malware. Other concerns included damage or loss of files, children viewing inappropriate content, cyberbullying and ID or password theft.

While there are plenty of parental controls and blocks available, they aren't foolproof. Educating children about the potential risks and how to avoid them can go a long way toward protecting your family from potential cyber problems.

Open up a conversation with your children about cyber security with these tips from the experts at Trend Micro:

Understand what you're saying yes to. Be involved, knowledgeable and interested in the devices, apps and sites your children use for school and for fun. For sites they use for school, ask their teachers for more information. For apps they're using at home, spend 15 minutes trying it out yourself.

Use privacy settings and features. Make sure you understand what privacy protections your browser or devices offer for your family when your kids are accessing their favorite sites, apps and online services. Many browsers allow you to prevent sites from tracking what you do and where you go online, so spend some time looking at web browser settings to see what privacy options are available to you. Mobile devices also have settings that can restrict apps from knowing your physical location or accessing your camera, microphone, photos or contacts.

Use features and services available within an app or website. Also take a look at the privacy settings available in the specific apps, websites or games your family uses. Most will let you have a private account, which means the whole world won't be able to see what you post or who you're connected to. It also means that people have to ask your permission before they can follow you.

Remember that being online is a public life. Nothing is truly private online. If you and your family keep this in mind, it can help you all think through what you are about to post, like and click on, as well as who you connect with online.

Talk to other families. Other kids or families may have a different definition of what is or isn't "private." Encourage your kids to talk to their friends about how they will respect each other's privacy online. Good friends will understand, think and ask before posting a photo or information about their friends. Talk to other parents about your feelings on privacy, too, and ask for their opinions with the goal of protecting and respecting each other's privacy online.

Source: Trend Micro

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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