RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Get the Best Deals on Airfare

February 6, 2018 1:39 am

Whether you're looking ahead to that summer vacation or a spring break getaway, it pays to be thrifty. To help, has released a list of tips and tricks for seniors and retirees on how to save money on travel this year.

Avoid Peak Travel Season. Every destination is busy at different times of the year. By doing a little research ahead of time, you can potentially save a lot of money by knowing when the airlines, hotels, and rental car companies are most in need of the business.

According to CheapOair's booking data from 2017, many popular international destinations saw large airfare difference between the slowest months and the busiest months.  

- Passengers that traveled from the U.S. to China in September 2017 instead of June 2017 on average saved 37 percent on airfare.

- Passengers that traveled from the U.S. to Spain in February 2017 instead of July 2017 on average saved 36 percent on airfare.

- Passengers that traveled from the U.S. to Australia in August 2017 instead of December 2017 on average saved 29 percent on airfare.

- Passengers that traveled from the U.S. to Italy in March 2017 instead of June 2017 on average saved 25 percent on airfare.

Consider all of your options before booking. Many airlines have recently changed their fare structures to have very low base fares, but then charge extra fees for things such as checked baggage, carry-on luggage, or seat selection. Before booking the lowest fare you see, read the fine print to double check what’s included and what’s not. Depending on your preferences, it may be worthwhile to book a more expensive (but more comprehensive) fare upfront to save money on the fees you could be charged later.

Be flexible with your dates. Booking engines like allow travelers to see the cheapest dates for travel even before selecting their intended travel dates. Since retirees are less time-constrained, consider taking advantage of the ability to fly on cheaper days.

Sign up for a travel credit card. Travel credit cards are a great way for frequent travelers to earn reward points that are redeemable for future travel.

Source: CheapOair  

Published with permission from RISMedia.


How to Safely Slow Cook

February 6, 2018 1:39 am

For those of us who live a busy life and still need to nourish ourselves and our families, slow cookers can be a huge help. Simply load up your cooker before work, set the timer, and go. However, according to the National Fire Protection Association, the popular kitchen appliance causes an average of 150 home structure fires per year. Erie Insurance offers these slow cooker tips for a safe slow-cooked meal.

Not everything is better with age. If you're just starting out and you've been "gifted" your mom's (or grandma's) old slow cooker, there's something to consider: age. While it might be in great working order, a vintage slow cooker from the '70s or '80s with an insert firmly attached to the heating element might need to be upgraded. Some older models also had vent holes or a notch in the lid for a spoon. Slow cooker lids should fit snugly. If it’s warped or has one of the above-mentioned features, steam and heat will escape.

Make the connection. It's important to regularly check the slow cooker's electrical cord. If there's any sign of wear or tear, it's time to buy a new one. Using a slow cooker with a broken plug or wire is a fire hazard.

Location, location, location. It's important to keep the slow cooker away from the edge of countertops, and this includes not having the cord dangle off the edge. The closer it is to the edge, the easier it is for a person (or pet) to bump it or knock it over.

Tips to simmer over. If you're curious to see if your slow cooker is in working order, you can do a simple water test. Older slow cookers may not work as well as they once did, and for temperature and food safety purposes, the water test (see below) will help you decide if you should keep it or toss it.

Fill the slow cooker 2/3 full with tap water (tepid water) and set it on the low setting. After eight hours, use a thermometer to check the water's temperature, which should be at least 185 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Every slow cooker is different, with varying specifications by make and model. Follow the manufacturer's directions and take heed of anything suspicious or concerning.

Keep these tips in mind the next time you pull out your slow cooker or any other small kitchen appliances.

Source: Erie Insurance  

Published with permission from RISMedia.