RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Out There: Rent…or Live on a Cruise Ship?

July 8, 2016 12:57 am


Rents in the U.S. are on the rise, limiting housing options for many. While the industry is working to address affordability concerns, one search engine has developed an alternative solution.

According to a report by CruiseWatch, a cruise search engine, renters in some cities are better off cruising on a ship continuously for a year than paying rent for the same period.

“To go on non-stop cruises and save some money is an impressive proposition,” said Britta Bernhard, co-founder of CruiseWatch, in a statement.

We’ll let that, ahem, sink in.

Using Census Bureau data and their own cruise statistics, the search engine compared cost-of-living expenses to cruise prices.

The average rental household in New York City, for instance, spends approximately $637 a week on living expenses, compared to the $313.25 per-week average for a cruise—a savings of over $16,500 a year.

The average household in Honolulu, on the other hand, would save over $7,500 a year cruising instead of renting. Those in Los Angeles would save $2,058 a year; those in San Francisco would save $7,154 a year; those in Stamford, Conn. would save $3,878 a year.

Cruisers can expect the most savings starting their year-long cruise in winter, when prices are at their lowest, according to the report.

Cruising for an entire year is enticing. Would you pay for a cruise instead of paying for rent?

Source: CruiseWatch
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Aging-in-Place Primer: Lots of Risks Lurking

July 8, 2016 12:57 am


The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) 2013 report, “Consumer Product-Related Injuries to Persons 65 Years of Age and Older,” shed light on the aging-in-place risks facing those who remain in their homes as they age. The report, which assessed the products most associated with injuries and fatalities, revealed most incidents involved falls.

The CPSC recently developed a companion report evaluating incidents unrelated to falls. According to the report, nearly 30 percent of product-related fatalities reported to the CPSC were not as a result of a fall. The most fatal non-fall hazards include:

• ‘Swimming Activity, Pools, Equipment’ (379 incidents)
• ‘Clothing, All’ (Fire-Related) (293 incidents)
• ‘Bathtub and Shower Structures’ (253 incidents)
• ‘Cigarettes, etc., Lighters, Fuel’ (252 incidents)
• ‘Home Fires/CO/Gas Vapors with Unknown Product’ (244 incidents)
• ‘ATVs, Mopeds, Minibikes, etc.’ (174 incidents)
• ‘Cooking Ranges, Ovens, etc.’ (165 incidents)

Non-fall fatalities were reported more by adults age 65 to 69 than those older, the report found. (In contrast, fall-related fatalities peak between the ages of 84 and 89.)

With the life expectancy of the average American rising from 70.8 years in 1970 to close to 80 today, it is important for homeowners aging-in-place to understand the risks associated with products in their homes.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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