RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Report: 'Work Martyrs' Are Mostly Millennials

August 22, 2016 2:33 am


Forfeiting time off from work is not uncommon—it is most common, however, among millennials.

“The ‘entitled millennial’ narrative is dead wrong when it comes to vacation,” says Katie Denis, author of the recently released Project: Time Off report “The Work Martyr’s Cautionary Tale: How the Millennial Experience Will Define America’s Vacation Culture.”

“As the largest generation in the workforce—one that is now stepping into management—millennials are developing vacation attitudes that will define and negatively affect America's work culture,” Denis says.

According to the report, millennials are the generation most likely to have a “work martyr” mindset: forgoing time off from work out of fear or guilt.

“The circumstances of the millennial experience—the Great Recession and its aftershocks, growing student debt, and an always-connected lifestyle—have created a perfect storm for their work martyr behavior,” says Denis.

Work martyrs avoid taking time off work for a variety of reasons, the report found, such as:

• They believe they are showing complete dedication to the job.
• They believe they will be perceived as replaceable.
• They believe they may lose consideration for a raise or promotion.
• They believe only they can do the job.
• They believe their boss may have a negative reaction.

The report indicates the work martyr culture is perpetuated from both sides: millennials in management roles not only feel they cannot take time off, but also feel pressure to deny time-off requests from those they supervise.

Still, most millennials believe a work martyr is a good role to assume, and that the martyr mindset will be positively received by their bosses.

Denis cautions less time off can have widespread negative effects across all working generations.

“There are larger implications for the workforce when people don't take vacation,” Denis says. “Time off is essential to employee productivity, creativity, and overall performance.”

Source: Project: Time Off
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Homeowners Ask: Is It Too Early for an End-of-Season Cleanup?

August 22, 2016 2:33 am


The answer is no!

Summer is coming to a close, and for homeowners, now is the time to conduct property maintenance ahead of the change of season. Home improvement blogger Michael Miller and Seniorific.com recommend an end-of-season cleanup include the following tasks:

Remove thatch build-up. Thatch prevents moisture, oxygen and sunlight from reaching soil, potentially inhibiting the growth of (and harming) the lawn.

Perforate the lawn to allow air, fertilizer and water to strengthen its roots and reduce compacted soil.

Feed the lawn with a slow-release fertilizer to allow grass to soak up nutrients that will help it recover from summer heat and stress.

Store the lawn mower. Consult the owner’s manual for best practices when disposing of unused gasoline and storing.

Plant spring bulbs, like daffodils and tulips, if the climate permits. (Planting too early can cause them to sprout before winter!)

Water shrubs and trees once they go dormant (but before the ground freezes). Use a root irrigator or soaker hose.

Stow hoses. Inspect the hoses thoroughly before putting them away for the winter—check for leaks around connectors, and drain all water out of the hose.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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