RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Protecting Against Zika: How Homeowners Can Do Their Part

July 21, 2016 1:24 am


Zika has hit home. The good news? There are simple steps homeowners can take to lessen the spread of the virus, says Karen Reardon, vice president of Public Affairs with RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment)®.

“Putting up mosquito barriers, reinforcing your home and property, removing standing water where mosquitoes breed and knocking down existing mosquito populations with EPA-approved solutions create a four-sided barrier of protection,” Reardon said in a statement.

Preventing the spread of Zika at home, according to RISE, includes replacing any damaged or sagging door or window screens, keeping doors and other entry points closed, and eliminating standing water on the property. Water often collects in birdbaths, buckets, flower pots, fountains, gutters and wading pools.

Personal mosquito barriers include wearing light-colored, long-legged and long-sleeved clothing, or repellant-treated apparel.

Homeowners should also ensure the members of their household use EPA-approved repellants. Products endorsed by the EPA, RISE states, have been deemed effective and safe. EPA-approved labels will indicate if the product is specifically for Aedes mosquito protection, which is the category through which Zika is transmitted.

Some homeowners are also going above and beyond these steps, according to a recent RISE survey: 53 percent of homeowners surveyed are planning to apply pesticides to their yards, and 47 percent are considering adding mosquito control to their lawn care routine.

Zika causes symptoms such as mild fever and rash, and may be tied to birth defects.

Source: RISE (Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment)®
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Unpacking Summer's Hottest Housing Trends – Pt. 2

July 20, 2016 1:21 am


Part 1 of this series, which breaks down three of summer’s hottest housing trends—named by ApartmentList.com—sized up the micro apartment movement, currently gaining steam in cities like San Francisco and Seattle.

Co-living is another trend to watch this season, according to ApartmentList.com. Co-living arrangements are ideal for those looking for communal habitation.

Co-living arrangements are often comprised of multiple residents sharing a house, or sharing full floors in apartment buildings. Most co-living units are fully-furnished with unlimited essentials like coffee and toilet paper. Residents in the co-living arrangement share amenities like the kitchen, laundry room, workspace, gym or spa.

Companies who manage co-living units generally offer leases on a month-to-month basis, in response to mobile lifestyles. The cost of co-living is cheaper compared to a typical apartment of the same size—in San Francisco, for instance, the Coliving Club costs $998 per month.

Dezeen.com—home of one of industry’s most well-known architecture and design magazines—recently featured New York City's WeLive co-living project, a development of 200 fully-furnished and serviced shared residential units. The feature reports prices start at $1,375 per person for a space in a shared unit and $2,200 for an individual studio, plus a monthly amenities fee of $125.

For now, co-living appears to be a viable arrangement in cities, where space comes at a premium. Will co-living take hold in outlying areas? Time will tell.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of this series: tiny houses.

For more summer housing trends, visit ApartmentList.com.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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