RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Hardwood vs. Laminate: What's Best for Your Floor?

August 8, 2016 1:54 am


Wood or wood-like flooring can give your home a brand new look—warm, updated, and inviting. There are several factors to consider before making the choice.

Natural hardwood flooring is more visually appealing, but is twice as expensive and far less durable than laminate lookalikes. On the other hand, laminates, like Pergo, which cost half as much as hardwood, will not increase your home’s resale value.

The experts at GeeksonHome.com tick off items to consider:

Cost – Laminate flooring, which is made of pressed wood, costs $2 to $3 per square foot, while natural hardwood flooring costs between $3 and $6 per square foot.

Durability – Hardwood flooring is sensitive to dents and scratches—a point to consider if you have young children or pets, or if your home sees high traffic. It can, however, be refinished several times over its lifetime, though that will incur additional expense.

Laminate, conversely, is impervious to stains and dents, but, because the wood veneer is very thin, it cannot be refinished.

Overall, the lifespan of laminate flooring is said to be 15 to 20 years, while hardwood flooring can last well over 50 years if refinished as needed.

Installation – Installing laminate flooring is faster and easier than installing hardwood flooring, because laminate comes in sheets rather than individual boards, and is usually glued down, rather than nailed into place.

Moisture – Hardwood flooring is susceptible to moisture and high humidity. It should not be laid directly on a concrete floor or in basements, where moisture can cause the wood to contract, expand and warp.

Laminate, to compare, is stable. Moisture will not affect or damage laminate flooring, so it can be laid on concrete.

Bottom line: laminate flooring is less expensive, more durable and easier to maintain—and today’s laminate products do a better job of looking like natural wood than ever before. The quality of hardwood, however, is easy to recognize, will last a lifetime, and, if properly maintained, can add significant value to your home. 
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Homeowner Safety: Tips to Prevent Grilling Fires

August 8, 2016 1:54 am


Close to 10,000 home fires involving barbecues, grills or hibachis happen every year, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)—and most start on a balcony or porch outside the home.

Lack of maintenance is one of the primary causes of fires, says Lorraine Carli, vice president of Outreach and Advocacy for the NFPA. Grillers should remove grease and other build-up from the grill grates and trays often.

“It’s good practice to check for damage before using the grill for the first time each year, and to check the entire grill regularly,” Carli said in a statement.

Carli and the NFPA also recommend only grilling on propone or charcoal barbecues outdoors, away from the home and any other structures or materials that may catch fire, including tree branches. Children and pets should be kept at least three feet away from the grill at all times, and preferably out of the pathway to the home or hose.

Never leave the grill unattended, the NFPA advises. Often, fires begin when no one is looking.

For more fire safety tips, visit www.nfpa.org.

Source: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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