RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Pros and Cons of Listing Your Home During the Holidays

December 11, 2017 1:48 am

This time of year, the last thing most folks are probably thinking about is selling or buying a home. That is, except for the thousands of people who are in a position where they need to sell or buy a home.

While this presents a somewhat limited range of opportunities for both home sellers and motivated prospects, there are a number of things to consider if you are among that small but no less important demographic.

At FortuneBuilders, Konrad Sopielnikow blogs that by selling a home during the cold, winter months of the holidays, you can unearth lucrative opportunities that would be difficult to find the rest of the year.

Sopielnikow says the cyclical and seasonal lack of competition, greater flexibility of scheduling for sellers and buyers, and the ability to achieve a quick and profitable outcome are just a few advantages.

He also notes that the end of the year is typically when many businesses offer positions to new employees. As a matter of fact, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics posted a gain of 151,000 jobs in January of 2016.

Sopielnikow suspects in many cases, these were jobs in which the employee relocated. And if there’s one sector of holiday homebuyers who are highly motivated, he says it’s the individual and/or family relocating due to a new job.

So anyone ready to move on from a property quickly can gain the advantage by tapping into this powerful, psychological motivator.

Elizabeth Weintraub at thebalance.com says sellers face a measurably higher challenge at year's end because they will be appealing to a much smaller inventory of buyers who have very specific needs.

Also, both parties' agents might be on vacation or otherwise unavailable in December as markets move into a seasonal slowdown.

But Weintraub counters that this could be a perfect opportunity for anyone marketing a hard-to-sell home, which might rise to the top when there are fewer homes for sale over the holidays.

And if you are selling through to the New Year, she says don't block or cover up important selling features such as fireplace mantels, stairs, stained-glass windows with decorations.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Don't Get Scammed by a Faulty Cashier's Check!

December 11, 2017 1:48 am

When selling a big-ticket item like a vehicle or electronics, accepting a cashier's check may seem like a safe bet. However,  Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin L. Wiessmann warns consumers to be privy to a current Counterfeit Cashier's Check Scam.

Wiessmann explains how this scam works:

This scam targets individuals selling expensive items through classified advertising or online auctions.

The counterfeiter, who is often in another country, poses as an interested buyer and offers to pay with a fake cashier's check. After the victim presents the fake check to the bank, the buyer suddenly backs out of the deal and asks for a refund. Because the funds from the check are available from the bank after a few days, the victim assumes the check has cleared and agrees to return the money.

By the time the bank discovers the forgery – which could be up to 60 days later -- the bogus buyer is long gone and the victim must now repay the bank for the amount of the fake cashier's check.

In other cases, the counterfeiter may send a cashier's check for more than the asking price of the item and then ask the victim to wire the "overpayment" back or to a third party.

"There was a time when cashier's checks were considered the next best thing to cash," Wiessmann says. "Today, sophisticated forgeries of this once trusted payment method are being used to bilk private sellers out of large sums of money, and consumers need to be vigilant about the people with whom they are doing business."

Wiessmann points to five tips that can help consumers avoid being robbed by the counterfeit cashier's check scam:

- Understand that although the bank may allow you to withdraw money soon after depositing a cashier's check, that does not mean the check has cleared.

- You are responsible for the funds you deposit until your bank has received the money from the institution where the check originated or the true account holder of the originating check reports the fraud (this could take more than 60 days).

- Be cautious of transactions with strangers who pay with cashier's checks. Make sure to tell the buyer that you will send the item only after the check has cleared.

- Avoid any situation where someone overpays for an item and demands that the extra money be returned.

- Contact the issuing financial institution to verify the check is authentic, being careful not to rely on the contact information printed on the check itself as it may be false. They may be able to more reliably detect a fraudulent check.

Source:  http://www.state.pa.us

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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