RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Tips for Prioritizing Your Fall Maintenance Projects

September 13, 2017 2:08 am

No matter what part of the country your home is in, the coming of fall signals an opportunity to do whatever necessary or voluntary projects need to be done ahead of winter weather, the coming holiday season, and the New Year.

At soundbuilthomes.com, Elizabeth Kraus wonders if you have been putting off re-staining or sealing your deck? Her advice: take advantage of the remaining warm, dry weather to clean and seal or stain your deck before wet weather arrives to do damage.

The same, Kraus says, goes for your home’s window and door trim, gutters and other areas which may have had surfaces exposed, paint or stain eroded, and see to any loose exterior trim pieces, window or door seals, gutters, shingles, siding or roofing.

Kraus says late summer and early fall present the perfect time to have ducts and chimney flues cleaned and vacuumed, before you shut yourself and your family behind closed doors and windows with all of the dust which may have accumulated during the past year. And don't forget to dust off the blades of those ceiling fans, too!

The Virginia Farm Bureau (Vafb.com) says simply walking around the outside of your house is the best way to detect any areas in need of attention.

Got any obvious openings under your porches, or into your crawlspace, or basement? The bureau suggests sealing any places where wild animals might take winter refuge.

The bureau also says this time of year is an ideal opportunity to address this punch list:

- Trim back tree branches and brush that might damage your house during a storm, and remove dead trees near your house that pose a risk to your house during high wind storms

- Check that all outdoor stairs are in good shape and have sturdy railings

- Check your plumbing, testing pressure valves on hot water heaters and move any flammable materials away from furnace, hot water heater, and other heat sources

- Check water hoses on washer, ice maker, and dishwasher for leaks

- Clean lint from the clothes dryer exhaust duct and surrounding area to prevent fires

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Plumbing Safety Tips in Case of Emergency

September 13, 2017 2:08 am

When an emergency strikes, it's best to be prepared. The experts from Benjamin Franklin Plumbing ® offer the following tips to make sure you know how to ready your plumbing systems for any potential storms.  

- Check all downspouts and roof gutters to ensure they are securely fastened, free of debris and draining properly.
- Make sure yard culverts and street drains are free of debris and can carry water away as fast as possible.
- Consider installing a battery back-up pump that will operate in the event of a power failure.
- Inspect all floor drains throughout the house, including those in the garage, driveway, and basement.
- If you lose water pressure, open a faucet at the highest point in the house (such as an upstairs bathroom) to allow air into the system. Then draw water as needed from the lowest faucet in the home.
- Safe, clean water can be found in the water heater or a pressure tank for use in an emergency.
- If there is enough advanced warning of the emergency, assure the freshest water supply by flushing the tank and allowing it to refill with clean water.
- Turn off electricity or gas to the water heater so there is no risk that the heating unit could come on while the tank is being emptied. Draw water as needed from the drain valve at the bottom of the tank.
- Water stored in your home's plumbing system is safe - for a few days. After a longer time, it must be disinfected before it is used for drinking or cooking.
- Fill sinks and bathtubs with water for emergency use. Water stored this way is perfect for cleaning dishes, bathing or flushing toilets. However, due to the difficulty in getting tubs and sinks clean, this water is not recommended for drinking and cooking unless it is first disinfected.

For homes with basements:
- Inspect basement sump pump, if you have one. Ensure it is discharging water properly and is not clogged with debris. Do this by pouring a few buckets of water into your sump pit. In a matter of seconds, the pump should discharge the water and shut itself off.  Consider installing a battery back-up pump that will operate in the event of a power failure.

Source: Benjamin Franklin

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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