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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How To Avoid Pantry Pests

November 9, 2017 1:39 am

We've all been there: we're reaching for an ingredient from a box in the cabinet only to find a few things in there that weren't part of the original contents.

Fortunately, there are a few easy ways to keep pesky critters out of your flour, oatmeal, crackers and more.
Barbara Dahl, Consumer and Family Economics Educator, University of Illinois Extension, assures that these unwelcome guests can even be found in a spotless home because they crawl through cracks, fly through open windows or hide in groceries.  

Dahl's advice for keeping bugs out:
- Don't buy more grain products than you can use in a short time.
- Look at food from each package under a bright light.
- Get rid of packages that have insect webs or insect pieces.
- Place the good food in airtight glass, plastic or metal containers, or in the refrigerator.
- Do not buy opened or crushed packages. They may already have insects or be easy for insects to get in.
- Clean up any spills in cabinets right away.
- Clean food storage areas well, at least once a year.

Erin Huffstetler of thebalance.com says if you have pets, check their food, toss any infested items that you find, and wipe down any affected cans with undiluted vinegar.

Remember, infested items should go straight to an outdoor trash can - placing them in your kitchen trash will only spread the problem.

Once you've removed the problem items, Huffstetler says to give your pantry a thorough cleaning:

- Pull out shelf liners (and wash or replace them).
- Vacuum the shelves, paying special attention to corners, undersides, shelf brackets and mounting hardware.
- Vacuum the walls, baseboards, trim, floor, ceiling and door (including the inside edge, hinges and knob).
- Wipe down pantry shelves with hot, soapy water or vinegar and mop the floor.

When you're done with your clean up, Huffstetler says to remove the vacuum bag, and take it out to your outside trash bin. If you have a bagless vacuum, wash out the dust compartment.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Quick Fixes for Common Household Glitches

November 9, 2017 1:39 am

Sometimes it seems there’s always something around the house that needs fixing – and the longer you put off doing the fixing, the more the glitches seem to multiply.

Real Simple Magazine suggests quick fixes to help keep your living space looking tip-top without tearing chunks out of your weekend:

Squeaky wood floor. The fix isn’t permanent, but for temporary relief from that annoying squeak, sprinkle a little talcum powder over the noisy area, then sweep it into the cracks between floorboards and wipe off the excess.  

Stained tub. Combine equal amounts of cream of tartar and baking soda with enough lemon juice to make a paste. Rub the mixture into the stain with your fingers or a soft cloth. Let sit for a half hour, then rinse well with water.

Stubborn sliding windows. If they’re not sliding easily, a little silicone spray lubricant (sold at hardware stores) will grease the skids. Spray it onto a rag, then wipe along the tracks.

Worn, dry cutting board. Gently warm a bottle of pure mineral oil (available at drugstores) in a bowl of hot water, then wipe the oil onto the surface with a soft cloth. Wipe off the excess four to six hours later.

Scuffed linoleum. Rubbing an eraser over it may be all you need. If not, try rubbing the spot with a little white toothpaste on a clean rag.

Water rings on wood. Someone forgot to use a coaster? Make that ring go away with an equal mix of white toothpaste and mayonnaise. Apply, then wipe off with a soft cloth. You may have to rub it for a bit for the ring to lighten considerably.

Scratched glass tabletop. Mix a small amount of water with a little white toothpaste and baking soda to make a paste. Using a clean, slightly damp cloth, rub the paste into the scratch using a tiny, circular motion. Wash it off with a clean, soft cloth.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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