RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

5 Wise Ways to Use $100

September 30, 2016 2:12 am


Maybe you got a tax refund. Maybe a friend paid back an old debt. Maybe you got from one paycheck to the next and—amazingly—had $100 left over. You may be tempted to blow your windfall, but $100 doesn’t buy all that much these days. Far better, according to The Motley Fool, is to use that $100 in one of these 5 wise ways:

1. Start/Add to an Emergency Fund – Surveys reveal a shocking number of Americans do not have enough money set aside to cover a $1,000 emergency. Ideally, an emergency fund should hold three to six months of living expenses.

2. Start/Add to a Retirement Fund – It may not seem like much, but if you were to put that $100 in a 401(k) or IRA and choose investments that generate an average annual 8-percent return, after 40 years, it would amount to almost $2,200!

3. Pay Down a Credit Card – Carrying a credit card balance, no matter how small, means losing money every month to interest. Granted, that $100 on its own probably won't save you a lot in interest, but it will get you one step closer to becoming debt-free.

4. Buy Stock – A single Ben Franklin won't make you a fortune in the stock market, but you can use it to open a low-cost, no- or low-minimum brokerage account and start investing for your future.

5. Invest in Yourself – If a certification or skill is standing in the way of a higher salary, use that $100 to pay for a course or license that helps you command more money—if a $100 online web design course results in a $1,000 bump in salary, that’s a 900-percent return on investment!
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Rid Your Home of Pests Before Winter Hits

September 30, 2016 2:12 am


No matter where you live, there’s always the potential for neighborhood residents—pests—to make your home their home.

Ridding your home of pests is best done before winter sets in, says Steve Evans of Underwriters Laboratories (SafeBee.com). Evans warns that mice and other rodents are known to chew the protective sheathing off electrical wires, leaving the underlying metal exposed. Unprotected wiring can short-circuit and spark, possibly leading to a house fire.

Fortunately, most homeowners can prevent pests from ever becoming a problem by sealing up every crevice in their home—but only if the situation is under control, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Pest problems that call for professional evaluation should be dealt with as soon as possible, and preferably by a licensed exterminator.

If sealing is outside of your skill set, a drywall or masonry contractor may be needed, adds John Drengenberg of the CDC. Ensure the contractor fills holes inside the home first—outside holes should remain open temporarily so that rodents can exit.

Be cautious when cleaning, Evans says. Avoid sweeping or vacuuming in areas that have been infested—doing so can stir up dust and waste. Instead:

• Open windows to air out the infested area for at least half an hour before cleanup. Stay out of the area while it airs out.

• Wear protective gloves, goggles and a mask to avoid coming into contact with contaminated air or dust.

• Spray the infested area with bleach solution (one-part bleach to 10-parts water) and let it sit for 10 minutes. Use disposable rags to remove any waste. Mop the floor with the same bleach solution.

• Dispose of trash in a sealed plastic bag.

• Remove your gloves and scrub your hands with hot, soapy water.

Do not attempt to clean the area if it is heavily infested, Drengenberg says. Consult with a pest control professional—he or she will not only perform the cleanup, but also educate you on health and safety.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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