RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Preventing Water Damage at Home

August 30, 2016 1:00 am


Any homeowner who’s experienced flooding knows how damaging water can be. Millions of dollars are spent on water-related repairs and restorations each year, says Eric Corbett, owner of Larry & Sons, Inc., a Maryland-based air conditioning, heating and plumbing company.

“Water damage can be caused by any size leak,” Corbett says. “Even if it starts out relatively small, it has the potential to create a major problem inside your home. This leads to costly repairs if proper precautions are ignored."

Water leaks account for up to 14 percent of water usage in the average household, Corbett notes. Waterproofing potential leak sources is one way to not only reduce that percentage, but also lessen damage should a leak occur.

One of the most common leak sources is a running toilet, Corbett says. To determine whether a leak is present, drop a few drips of food dye into the toilet tank—evidence of a leak will be obvious after about 20 minutes. Replace the valve inside the tank to prevent further leaking.

Many leaks occur in basements, Corbett adds. A damp basement should be remedied by a professional as soon as possible to mitigate appliance damage and mildew and mold growth.

Weathered pipes can also cause leaks, especially if they are rusted. Signs of a pipe leak include visual indicators of accumulation, such as wet drywall, and dripping sounds, Corbett says.

Leaks can happen outside of the home, as well. Vibrant green vegetation or moss growth around a sprinkler head could be a sign of a broken head or damaged valve—a leak that must be addressed by a professional, says Corbett.

“These are common water hazards that every homeowner faces at one time or another,” Corbett concludes. “It's a lot simpler than many people think to waterproof their homes and avoid those issues.”

Source: Larry & Sons, Inc.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Cost of Housing: 25 Metros and the Salaries Needed to Live in Them

August 30, 2016 1:00 am


Homeownership comes with costs—in some markets more than others. How much will you need to earn to purchase a home in your area?

HSH.com recently calculated the salaries needed to afford housing payments on a median-priced home in 25 metropolitan areas, including mortgage principal and interest, taxes and insurance. HSH assumed a 20 percent down payment and weighed the standard 28 percent “front-end” debt ratio with the most recent median home prices reported by the National Association of REALTORS®.

The salary minimums, according to HSH’s calculations, are:

1. Cincinnati, Ohio – $37,179
2. St. Louis, Mo. – $38,131
3. Detroit, Mich. – $38,542
4. Atlanta, Ga. – $40,092
5. Phoenix, Ariz. – $44,716
6. Tampa, Fla. – $44,875
7. San Antonio – $48,753
8. Orlando, Fla. – $49,382
9. Minneapolis, Minn. – $51,794
10. Houston, Texas – $52,275
11. Philadelphia, Pa. – $53,422
12. Dallas, Texas – $54,764
13. Baltimore, Md. – $56,837
14. Chicago, Ill. – $62,456
15. Miami, Fla. – $65,120
16. Sacramento, Calif. – $65,363
17. Portland, Ore. – $70,613
18. Denver, Colo. – $72,847
19. Washington, D.C. – $81,940
20. Seattle, Ore. – $82,671
21. New York, N.Y. – $86,215
22. Boston, Mass. – $87,557
23. Los Angeles, Calif. – $92,092
24. San Diego, Calif. – $109,441
25. San Francisco, Calif. – $161,948

Don’t see your area listed? Consult a local real estate professional for the most accurate affordability estimates for your area, or visit HSH.com/finance/mortgage/salary-home-buying-25-cities.html.

Source: HSH.com
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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