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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Is It Really Possible to Save Money When You're Moving?

September 14, 2016 1:33 am


After making the costly investment in a new home, the last thing you want to do is spend a penny more than necessary getting all your stuff into it. So, we sought out some expert advice on the subject to help ensure your move goes as economically as possible.

Ross Sapir, founder and CEO of Roadway Moving of New York City, says proper research and planning can ensure you're not breaking the bank on your next move. He offers the following five cost-saving tips.

Start by getting rid of a few things. Sapir says bringing fewer items to your new home could make the move a little less expensive.

You might think it's easier and more cost-efficient to have your family and friends help with your next move—wrong, Sapir says. Professional movers are fast, show up on time, bring a truck and tools, and are less likely to break any of your belongings.

When picking your movers, Sapir says make sure you do your research. Companies that offer white-glove service to their customers will not only guarantee the job will be done correctly, but they will help you with setting up your cable and utilities.

Sapir says some utility companies won't prorate your bill based off your departure date, so if your billing cycle doesn't line up with your moving date, think about cutting off one of your services so you're not paying for an extra month. It's probably not smart to cut off the electricity, but you could definitely do without cable for a couple of weeks.

Choose your date wisely, as well. Sapir says the majority of moves occur between May and September, making those five months the highest demand for moving services. Since most moving companies are fully booked during the summer, they won't be as inclined to offer you a good bargain. If you can plan your move during the off-season and book your date as early as possible, you'll have more potential cost saving options available.

You can also consult the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and its 'Protect Your Move' website (fmcsa.dot.gov) for more information.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Car-Buying: 5 Smart Tips

September 13, 2016 1:30 am


Considering buying a new car? Now may ideal—with new vehicles hitting the showroom floor, dealers are eager to unload outdated models. The smartest way to buy, according to the experts at non-profit GreenPath Financial Wellness, is to have a plan. Their tips:

1. Research – Many people buy cars based on what they look like or what they’re familiar with. Instead of buying the same type of car you've always driven, it may be wiser to list the features you’re looking for, and then do some research.  Know your credit history ahead of time, as well. Pull your credit report(s) from www.annualcreditreport.com to see if there are any red flags that might prevent you from getting an ideal interest rate.

2. Consider Financing – Once you know what you’re looking for, considering your buying options: leased, new or used. What financing options are realistic for you based on your income and credit? Don't borrow more money than you are comfortably able to repay.

3. Take Your Time – Start shopping around for dealer and selection incentives for your particular car choices. Do not rush—it's better to exercise patience when making your decision. Shop online as well as in person to compare prices for similar models.

4. Determine Payments – A lower monthly payment isn't always best—sometimes a dealer will simply increase the number of months on your loan in order to lower your monthly payment, but that often means you'll pay much more in interest over the life of the loan. Be careful about ending up in car loans that last six, seven or eight years—that's a long time to have a car payment (and a lot of interest to pay)!

5. Consider Other Costs – Your total transportation expense will include the vehicle payment, as well as everything else: insurance, gasoline, oil changes, ongoing maintenance, license plate fees, etc. Make sure you’ve added all potential costs into your budget.

Source: GreenPath Financial Wellness
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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