RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Making Your Home's 'Most Dangerous Room' a Little Safer

September 15, 2016 1:36 am


A handy interactive checklist and guide from the Home Instead Senior Care® network takes a comprehensive look at the most unsafe areas of the home for seniors. According to Home Instead, an overwhelming majority of ER doctors (100 percent in the U.S. and 99 percent in Canada), adult children (85 percent in the U.S. and 84 percent in Canada) and seniors (94 percent in the U.S. and 97 percent in Canada) agree that falls are the most common home accidents for older adults.

What can older adults who want to stay at home do? ER doctors in the U.S. and Canada are unanimous: an annual home check is key. Those physicians say injuries are most likely to happen in the:

Bathroom – 69 percent (56 percent in Canada)
Bedroom – 13 percent (14 percent in Canada)
Kitchen – 9 percent (12 percent in Canada)
Stairs – 5 percent

This means a room-by-room check can make all the difference in keeping seniors safe and independent at home. When it comes to the bathroom, the Home Instead checklist prompts these questions:

• Are grab bars available near the tub, shower and toilet?
• Is the floor slippery?
• Is there a lack of bath mats?
• Is the bathtub too high?
• Is the toilet the correct height?
• Is there the potential for bath water to be too hot?
• Are medications stored properly—not too high or too low for the senior to reach?
• Do mobility and joint problems make it difficult to reach into cabinets, comb hair or get into a bathtub?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, fixes may be in order to help make the most dangerous room in the house a lot safer.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Things Not to Buy at Warehouse Club Stores

September 14, 2016 1:33 am


Shopping at a warehouse club store is one way to save money on items such as food, wine and paper goods—but, say the consumer editors at Kiplinger’s, they're not the low price leader on many commonly purchased items. Avoid buying these items in particular, because they can generally be purchased at lower prices elsewhere:

Books and DVDs – Check before you buy. Deals on these items can often be purchased for 15 percent less online than at warehouse stores.

Canned Goods – Prices on these are hard to beat when they're on sale at the supermarket, where you'll pay on average 20 to 40 percent less than you would at warehouse stores.

Clothing and Shoes – Cheaply made clothing can be a costly mistake. Even when items at the warehouse stores have a designer label, they're often of lower quality, using cheaper fabrics and embellishments. Are they worth what you'll pay? It’s up to you.

Condiments and Cooking Oil – A huge jar of mayo or a three-pack of ketchup may be good buy if you use lots of it quickly, but the shelf life of condiments, once they're open (including oil), is relatively short, so you may be better off buying smaller quantities at grocery store sale prices.

Milk – Studies have shown you can usually buy a gallon of milk at the grocery store for 50 or 60 cents less a gallon than you'll pay at the warehouse club store. Surprisingly, some high-end stores have the best prices on organic or soy milks.

Name-Brand Cereals – Prices are generally pretty much the same at warehouse clubs and at grocery stores, but warehouse stores don’t have sales, so you'll find better prices when they go on sale at the supermarket.

Soda – According to Jeff Yeager, a frugal living expert and author of “The Cheapskate Next Store,” you'll always find better prices on soda when it’s on sale at the supermarket than you will at a warehouse club store. Check it for yourself!
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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