RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Money Doesn't Grow on Trees…but Home Value Does

October 6, 2016 2:24 am


(BPT)—Money doesn’t grow on trees…but home value does.

Planting a tree boosts property value, as well as the overall value of the neighborhood around it. In fact, research sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation’s Alliance for Community Trees reveals homebuyers pay an average 18 percent more for a house with trees in its yard, believing trees “define” their “neighborhood’s character.”

“The presence of trees in a neighborhood is as important to homebuyers as proximity to good schools, accessibility to shopping and entertainment, and commutability to work,” says Dana Karcher, Alliance for Community Trees program manager.

According to Karcher and the Alliance, mid-August through mid-October is the best time for those in northern, cooler areas to plant trees; those in southern areas can plant into November. The cool air, warm soil and wet weather at these times of year promote root growth, which is necessary before the ground freezes.

The best species to plant, according to the Alliance, are varieties that can withstand colder temperatures—ash, crabapple, elm, hawthorn, linden, maple, pine, spruce and sycamore are all ideal.

These species may be purveyed as “bare root,” or with exposed roots, “containerized and balled,” typically from nurseries, or “burlap,” or wrapped in burlap. The latter two—the container and the burlap—must be removed before planting; bare roots need only be soaked, according to the Alliance.

It may be beneficial to discuss planting trees with a local arborist or nursery. Tree care experts familiar with the growing conditions in your area will be best equipped to advise you on the types of trees to plant, as well as the window in which to plant them.

Source: Arbor Day Foundation (ArborDay.org)
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Stress Relievers That Really Work

October 5, 2016 2:24 am


Juggling family, work and obligations can be enough to stress anyone out in today’s hectic world. If you need a breather now and then, the Mayo Clinic suggests seven ways to slow down, regroup and refocus:

1. Exercise – A quick jog in the midst of a chaotic day—or even a brisk walk around the block—can get feel-good endorphins going.

2. Connect – Your stress instinct may be to wrap yourself in a cocoon. Instead, reach out to family and friends—doing so can offer distraction and provide support.

3. Meditate – Close your eyes for a few minutes—visualizing places you enjoy can help quiet the competing thoughts crowding your mind and causing stress.

4. Journal – Writing down your thoughts can help release pent-up emotion. Don't think about what to write — just let it happen. Don't worry about grammar or spelling, either!

5. Flex – Try yoga—just 10 minutes of controlled poses can help you slow down and relax. Take a class, or research online for some guidance to get started.

6. Listen – Listening to (or playing) music is a stress reliever because it decreases stress hormones and reduces muscle tension. Set aside 15 minutes or so and let your mind absorb it.

7. Laugh – Laughter fires up and then cools down your stress response. Get the giggles in by hanging out with friends in the break room, reading a few jokes (or telling some!), or watching a half-hour comedy.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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