RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Combatting Concussions in Youth Sports

February 17, 2017 2:06 am

(Family Features)--With athletes of all ages taking to fields and courts, there are important steps to take in keeping young athletes safe during practice and games.

Data from U.S. Youth Soccer shows that the number of kids playing increased nearly 90 percent - with nearly 3 million children ages 7-17 playing each year - from 1990 to 2014. As soccer has risen in popularity, so has the rate on injuries - especially concussions - according to a Nationwide Children's Hospital study published recently in "Pediatrics."

The number of youth treated in emergency rooms in the United States due to soccer-related injuries increased by 78 percent over the 25 years covered by the study. While concussions and other "closed-head" injuries accounted for just 7 percent of those injuries, the annual rate of those injuries per 10,000 children playing soccer increased drastically.

While the study's authors from the hospital's Center for Injury Research and Policy said some of the increase reflects the growing awareness about concussions, there are steps that can be taken to reduce exposure and increase overall player safety.

Know Concussion Signs

Be aware of concussion symptoms and encourage players to report potential injuries. The first signs of a player potentially suffering from a serious head injury can include:

- Headache
- Blurry vision
- Nausea
- Vomiting
- Noise or light sensitivity

Practice Proper Technique

The U.S Soccer Federation recently ruled that there should be no heading in games or practice for any players age 10 and under and a limited amount of heading for those ages 11-13. It is important that coaches know the correct techniques and have the right educational tools to properly train their players. The fundamental steps include:

1. Keeping feet shoulder-width apart and knees bent in an athletic position.

2. Tucking the chin and maintaining a stiff neck.

3. Using arms for balance (and to shield opponents).

4. Concentrating with eyes open and mouth closed.

5. Focusing on striking the ball with the middle of the forehead.

Understand Return-to-Play Protocol

Coaches and parents should encourage players to always report blows to the head and be vigilant in looking for athletes who may have sustained injuries. If a player does sustain a concussion, they should seek medical attention and work together with an athletic trainer on proper return-to-play protocol before returning to competition.

By instituting proper athletic safety measures at the youth level, coaches, parents and athletes can continue to enjoy the positive benefits of sports.

Source: National Soccer Coaches Association of America

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Trees Need Help? Hire a Pro

February 16, 2017 12:06 am

Aside from the obvious risk to your personal safety, tackling tree work on your own can also be harmful to your tree. Whether it’s pruning, having branches removed or taking down the tree entirely, hiring a professional is the way to go.

Professional tree-care companies are aware of what can harm the tree - such as using spikes for climbing - and come equipped with proper equipment, like ropes and climbing harnesses or aerial lift devices or cranes, if accessible. This, coupled with their training and experience, contributes to the future health of the tree. Here are some tips from the Tree Care Industry Association for finding the right professional:

Good References: Ask for references and check on the quality of the tree company’s work. Don't be rushed by a bargain and don't pay in advance.

Proof of Insurance: Ask for current certificates of liability and workers' compensation insurance, if applicable. Be aware that if the tree-care company you hire doesn't have insurance or is not a legal company, you could be held responsible as a contractor.

Solid Reputation: Verify professional affiliations the company might have, such as memberships in business and/or professional organizations such as the Tree Care Industry Association.

Up-to-Date Knowledge: Ask if they follow American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. A professional arborist will be aware of the current safety, pruning, fertilizing and cabling standards.

Contract: Insist on a signed contract as to cost, dates when work is to be performed, and exactly what is to be done. Insist that climbing spikes are used only if the tree is to be cut down.

Taking care of your tree needs professionally will ensure safety for all involved…most of all, your tree!

I hope you found these tips useful. Contact me for more helpful home advice and real estate information.

Source: Tree Care Industry Association

 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: