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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Travel Tips for Fall

September 28, 2017 12:53 am

Are you hoping to hit the road (or air) this fall? You're far from alone. With the prices lower than summer, the weather still temperate and the foliage in full bloom, many choose fall as the season to get away.
Below are a handful of fall travel tips from MultiVu.

Stay Within Budget: Fall is a great time to travel. There are a lot of deals in places like New York City, San Francisco, and D.C., but to find these deals, comparison shopping is key. On sites like Booking.com, you can check out affordable hotels, villas, apartments, or even boats or tree houses to stay in. They also have a customer service team to help travelers out 24 hours a day. Whether searching for an accommodation through the website or app, check out the guest-verified reviews.

Get Your Ride Ready: With stable gas prices, road trips are really popular with families this time of year. Before you hit the road, make sure your vehicle is road-ready and those tires are in good shape. Two big things: check your tire pressure and your tire tread—you can do that with a penny. Remember all tires are not created equal.

What to Pack: Fall is an active season for families. For starters, make sure you pack the right clothing. Also remember, hurricane season is not over—any bad weather can put travel plans in jeopardy. That's why more travelers are now looking to protect their travel investment, according to Allianz Travel Insurance. Travel insurance can reimburse your prepaid non-refundable expenses if you have to cancel a trip due to a natural disaster or for extended travel delays. It will also protect you against baggage issues and medical emergencies. If you do ever have to file a claim, you can do it straight from the TravelSmart app.

Source: MultiVu

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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A Closer Look at Vision Health

September 28, 2017 12:53 am

(Family Features)—An estimated 4.3 billion people suffer from the same health problem regardless of gender, age or ethnicity: vision impairment. Whether moderate or severe, vision impairment can have far-reaching social and economic impacts.

As the number of Americans with visual impairment is expected to double by 2050, vision health has an obvious role in the national health conversation. Uncorrected vision is highly noticeable among certain groups, like the elderly and workers who rely on vision for safe and effective job completion. According to the Vision Impact Institute, two other groups significantly impacted by poor vision are drivers and children.

Drivers
A study from the British Journal of Ophthalmology found that one of the major causes of visual impairment is uncorrected refractive error (URE), and that preventable URE causes nearly 80 percent of the global burden. The number of people impacted by URE is especially troubling when taking into account day-to-day activities such as driving. A report from the American Academy of Optometry revealed that even moderate visual field loss causes drivers to have significantly poorer capabilities in completing tasks, such as matching speed when changing lanes and maintaining lane position.

When you consider how changing technology and business models like ride-sharing companies and delivery services are adding drivers to the road, this impact becomes all the more crucial. If eye exams were part of the standard for renewing driver's licenses, then these issues could be called out by an eye care provider in advance of potential accidents on the road.

Children
Today, vision impairments and eye disorders are the third-leading chronic conditions among children in the U.S., with costs for direct medical care, vision aids, devices and caregivers amounting to $10 billion per year. In the U.S. alone, the total economic burden of eye disorders and vision loss was $139 billion in 2013.

Uncorrected vision problems in children can have serious negative impacts on their educations and future employment opportunities. In 2014, researchers studied the impact on academic performance after providing a vision screening and free eyeglasses to low-income and minority elementary school children in the U.S. The study found that among fifth grade students, both the screening and eyeglasses significantly improved student achievement in math and reading.

As 80 percent of all learning occurs through vision, a simple pair of eyeglasses could correct poor vision and drastically change the course of a child's life.

Source: visionimpactinstitute.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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