RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How Do Energy Savers Decorate for the Holidays?

November 24, 2016 2:09 am

It's that time of year for bright, glowing, blinking and shimmering holiday decorations start going up. But most homeowners would rather not see those cheery decorations doubling or tripling their energy bills. In light of this, we turned to a host of holiday helpers for some practical tips on energy efficient home holiday decorations.
The U.S. Dept. of Energy says think reflective so you can maximize the power of whatever lighting you choose. Reflective ornaments and tinsel are just as bright at night, so getting creative with your lighting display can multiply your resources for shine.

Their advice at energy.gov even suggests mirroring your neighbors' frighteningly costly display with a string of silver bells on your railing. Don't forget the ribbons, wreaths, garland, and reflective menorahs, for electricity- free age-old traditions that still 'reflect' your holiday cheer.

If you are looking for lighting, energy.gov says this year offers a variety of savings opportunities. You can find local rebates and coupons on ENERGY STAR® qualified Decorative Light Strings at many hardware and department stores.  These lights have a three-year warranty, come in a variety of colors, and have indoor and outdoor models.

The folks at directenergy.com say that replacing incandescent holiday lights with energy-efficient LED lights can help. ENERGY STAR® qualified LED lights use 70 percent less energy while providing a brighter light.  They also remain cool to the touch and are not made of glass or filament, making them safer for children. In addition, these bulbs also last 10 times longer, ensuring homeowners will have an energy-efficient solution for many years to come.

Shifting to other energy saving opportunities, improvementscatalog.com says if you plan on doing some holiday cooking or baking, consider using the microwave or toaster oven for smaller tasks such as melting chocolate for dipping, and keep the oven reserved for larger items, such as cooking a turkey. While cooking on the stove, keep the lids on your pots so your food will cook in less time.

The site also suggests if you are having family or friends over for a party, you can really take advantage of the body heat that will generate in your home. Have a warm and sparkling holiday season!

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Living Large - Why It's Time To Buy That Big House

November 23, 2016 2:09 am

A few years ago, I wondered if the trend in subdivision building of larger than average sized homes - 5,000 square feet or more - had seen its day. Apparently not.

According to a recent National Association of Home Builders report, and citing the Census Bureau’s Survey of Construction, new homes with 5,000 square feet or more of living space increased both as a share of all new construction and in absolute number in 2015.

And that same year, the share of new homes this size reached a post-recession peak of 3.9 percent of new homes started. The total number of 5,000+ square-foot homes started that year was 28,000 units.
NAHB analyst Ashok Chaluvadi observed that in 2012, the number of new homes started with 5,000+ square feet rose to 15,000 units, yet their share remained at only 2.8 percent.

In 2015, while the number of 5,000+ square feet homes started (28,000) was the highest since 2008, their share of the new market (3.9%) was the highest since 2004.

When analyzed by the different characteristics, Chaluvadi says that 79 percent of 5,000+ square feet home started have a finished basement, 68 percent have a 3 or more car garage, and at least 60 percent have a patio or porch.

More than half of these homes have 5 bedrooms or more, and 70 percent have 4 bathrooms or more.
But before you run out and start shopping for a large home, consider the advice of K.C. Hernandez at budgeting.thenest.com, who advises that before you make a large financial commitment on a bigger house, consider several financial and life factors to determine the right time to buy.

Hernandez says buying a bigger house makes the most sense when your income is stable and you expect it to remain the same or increase for the foreseeable future.

He also says that upgrading to a larger home is a good idea when market conditions favor buyers, who have more opportunity to negotiate better prices with sellers. Just keep in mind that if you plan to sell your current home before moving into a bigger one, you will likely face the same challenges finding buyers at the right price.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: