RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

On the Job: How to Get More Done Each Day

February 1, 2017 1:39 am

It happens to the best of us. You look at the rising list of emails in your inbox, the blinking light on your phone, the increasing number of unread texts, and panic sets in. You’ll never catch up, let alone get ahead.

Believe it or not, some simple adjustments in your daily habits can yield a more productive day and let you get a handle on your workload again. Try these:

Close your email. If you need to focus on getting a project done, close your email. The constant distraction of emails popping in diverts you from a task that might otherwise take no time at all.

Put your landline and your mobile on do not disturb. You can take an hour off from constant connection and get some real work done in the process.

Pop in your headphones. Today’s open work space environment often comes with frequent chatter and background noise, so plugging in to some relaxing music can help you stay focused on your work. Alternatively, hunker down in an available conference room or quiet lounge area. The change of scenery will remotivate you as well.

Pause and focus. Sometimes our worst enemy is our own mental distraction—issues at home, errands we need to run at lunch, what to make for dinner... Take a pause, take three deep breaths and focus in on the task at hand. Repeat this practice every time your inner chatter takes over.

Work from home. If you’re under a really big deadline, take a day and work from home, provided that’s not an even more distracting environment.

Tack on an hour before or after work. If you’re a morning person, getting in an hour early before your coworkers arrive and while your mind is at its sharpest can result in super productivity. Conversely, maybe you’re really foggy in the morning, but sharper once the sun goes down. If that’s the case, get in later and stay later.

While these strategies may seem simplistic, they actually can yield unbelievable results, turning overwhelming tasks into happy checkmarks on your to-do list.
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Protect Your Kids at Home

February 1, 2017 1:39 am

(Family Features)--Every year, more than 2,200 children die from injuries that occur at home, according to estimates from Safe Kids Worldwide. While every parent knows that accidents can and do happen, there are many areas of the home where some preventive steps can help reduce the risk. Go throughout your home to check for these common risk factors and implement corrective actions based on advice from the experts at Safe Kids.

Kitchen

Although it may be tempting to hold a fussy child while working in the kitchen, a safer alternative is a high chair where they can see all the action but be safely out of harm’s way. Place the chair or seat on the floor to avoid possible toppling from atop a counter or furniture, and use the provided straps as instructed to prevent falls and strangulation hazards.

Keep pan handles turned inward, out of reach of little hands, and before opening the oven door, ensure little ones are a safe distance away, putting your own body between the child and the oven so you can prevent any sudden lunges.

Use the rear burners when possible and keep dishes filled with hot food out of reach on counters or table tops.

Bathroom

Always check the water temperature before placing a child in the bathtub. Remember that small children cannot tolerate the same level of heat that many adults enjoy.

Use a minimal amount of water in the tub, as drowning can occur in as little as a couple of inches. Drain the tub as soon as you are finished.

Reduce access to other water sources by closing toilet lids and keeping bathroom and laundry room doors closed.

Immediately unplug and store items such as hair dryers, curling irons and straight irons, which can retain heat long after being turned off and pose an added strangulation danger with dangling cords.

Keep medication out of reach and always use the intended dosing devices. Common kitchen spoons vary greatly, so using these to measure a medication may be imprecise and result in over or under medicating.

Living Areas

Prevent window falls and injuries by installing window guards and stops.  

Eliminate dangling cords from blinds, either by hooking cords out of reach or using an alternative window covering.

When possible, place heavy items on low, sturdy furniture and use safety brackets, braces and wall straps to attach furniture and large items like TVs to the wall to prevent tipping.

Stairs

Use safety gates at the top and bottom of staircases to prevent falls. Ensure gates are securely attached on both sides and review manufacturer instructions to verify gates are constructed for their intended use. For example, not all gates are intended for use at the top of stairs and may give way under pressure.

Pantry/Garage

Products containing harmful chemicals, such as cleaners, should be stored out of reach, but also out of sight to avoid temptation.

Keep products in their original containers, which include instructions for proper use and guidance on what do to if ingested, rubbed in eyes, etc. This also helps ensure items are not mistaken for something else and used dangerously.

Source: eLivingToday.com.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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