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John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

How to Keep Your Pets Safe in a Storm

August 30, 2017 1:03 am

You may have a safety plan in place for your family, but have you thought about your pets? The American Humane Rescue team recently released the following tips to help care for your pet before, during, and after a storm.

Before the storm

- Microchip pets or put a tag on their collar with your name, address and cellphone number so they may be returned quickly in case you are separated from your pets. Be sure that any microchip information is up-to-date.

- Tie down or anchor outside objects that might fly about and injure someone.

- Know a safe place where your pets can go if you need to evacuate or seek shelter. Evacuation destinations may include a friend or family member's home, going to a pet-friendly hotel, or temporarily housing your pet(s) at a boarding facility. Plan multiple routes to your safe destination. Review your evacuation plan and double-check emergency supplies - including bowls, water and food.

- Evacuate your family and pets as early as you can and remember to take your disaster preparedness kit for your pets (i.e. First Aid kit, leashes, and pets' carrying cases, bowls, sanitation materials, chew toy, minimum 3 days, ideally 7-10 days of food, meds, water, your veterinarian's contact information, a photo of your pet).

- Bring pets inside; bring outdoor animals inside with a carrier ready large enough to turn around and lie down comfortably.

- Have a carrier at the ready. The portable carriers(s) should be large enough for your pets to stand-up and turn around in ready to go at a moment's notice. Practice loading cats and dogs in pet carriers before you have to.

- If your family must evacuate, take your pets with you.

During the storm….if you cannot evacuate

- Choose a safe room for riding out the storm—an interior room without windows – and take your entire family there, including your pets.

- Stay with pets. If crated, they depend on you for food and water. Don't leave pets in vehicles.

- Keep your emergency kit in that room with you (food, water, litter, meds, etc).

- Know your pet's hiding places. That's where they may run; keep them with you.

- Secure exits and cat doors so pets can't escape into the storm.

- Do not tranquilize your pets. They'll need their survival instincts should the storm require that.

After the storm

- Make sure the storm has fully passed before going outside and assess damages before allowing children or animals out.

- Keep dogs on a leash and cats in a carrier, and children close at hand. Displaced objects and fallen trees can disorient pets and sharp debris could harm them.

- Give pets time to become re-oriented. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and cause a pet to become confused or lost.

- Keep animals away from downed power lines and water that may be contaminated.

- Uncertainty and change in the environment affect animals, too, presenting new stresses and dangers. Your pet's behavior may change after a crisis, becoming more aggressive or self-protective. Be sensitive to these changes and keep more room between them, other animals, children or strangers. Animals need comforting, too. Comfort your pet with kind words and lots of pats or hugs. If possible, provide a safe and quiet environment, even if it is not their own home.

Source: American Humane and the American Humane Rescue program

Published with permission from RISMedia.


3 Steps Toward Better Sleep

August 30, 2017 1:03 am

(Family Features)--With over-scheduled days full of early-morning conference calls and endless to-do lists, it's impossible to avoid the stress that comes with working hard. Hand-in-hand with all that pressure, a lack of quality sleep can lead to aches and pains, stiffness, sore muscles, tingling or numbness in your extremities, general fatigue, as well as an increased risk of getting sick.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, the average adult needs 7-9 hours of sleep a night. In fact, a survey by Mattress Firm showed a correlation between stress and those who receive less sleep than recommended.

Twice as many stressed people get fewer than five hours of sleep each night compared to those who are not stressed. What's more, those who are stressed are five times more likely to experience insomnia at least once a month.

The proper amount and quality of sleep can have a dramatic impact on your life. If you're stressed and experiencing trouble sleeping, these tips from the sleep experts at Mattress Firm can help ensure you're getting the rest you need to improve your sleep health.

Minimize technology use before you head to bed. The survey found that quality of sleep is negatively impacted because of stress-induced technology use. For example, those who are stressed are 60 percent more likely to watch TV an hour before bed, more than twice as likely to post to social media an hour before bed, twice as likely to check email an hour before bed and more than 40 percent more likely to sleep with their phones next to their beds.

Ensure your body is getting adequate support. What felt comfortable to sleep on eight years ago may not provide the support your body needs today. Your weight, pressure points, ailments, etc. can change over the course of time, so it's important to check the mattress tag. If it's more than 8 years old, it is time to replace it. Another way to make sure your body has the proper support and alignment is to figure out your sleep position and select the right pillows to support your body. This can help alleviate tossing and turning, and provide a more comfortable night of sleep.

Avoid nighttime snacking. About 24 percent of extremely stressed people indulge in a snack an hour before bed, according to the survey. There are many food and drink options that encourage a good night's sleep more than others, such as tryptophan-rich foods like dairy, nuts and seeds, bananas, honey and eggs. Conversely, foods and medications with caffeine and foods with high-fat content should be avoided. The foods you choose are important, but also pay attention to the timing of when you eat and drink. Even fighting stress with an afternoon espresso can affect your ability to sleep hours later when your head hits the pillow.

Source: Mattress Firm

Published with permission from RISMedia.