RE/MAX 440
John F. O'Hara

John F. O'Hara
731 W Skippack Pike  Blue Bell  PA 19422
Phone:  610-277-4060
Office:  215-643-3200
Cell:  267-481-1786
Fax:  267-354-6973

My Blog

Just Say No to Credit Card Cash Advances

June 19, 2017 2:15 am

If you’re a little strapped for money, it can be tempting to take a cash advance from your credit card. Doing so, however, will end up costing you more in the long-run.

According to a CreditCards.com survey of 100 cards' cash advance terms, credit card cash advances are a costly way to borrow money. The average cash advance APR is 23.68 percent, much higher than the average purchase APR of 15.79 percent. More importantly, none of the cards studied offer a grace period for cash advance transactions like they do for traditional credit card purchases. So when you take cash out, you start accruing interest immediately.  

For example, if someone purchases a $1,000 item on a credit card with a 15.79 percent rate and pays it off in 30 days, they'll pay no interest thanks to the grace period. But, a $1,000 cash advance under the typical terms found in the survey will cost an extra $69.73. That includes the $50 upfront fee, plus $19.73 for 30 days' interest at 23.68 percent.

Cash advances are not just ATM and convenience check transactions, either. Consumers should note that wire transfers, money orders, legal gambling purchases and bail bonds are often treated as cash advances if paid via credit card. Additionally, if you hold a checking account with the same bank that issues your credit card, overdraft coverage that comes from your credit card may also be considered a cash advance.

Paying off a cash advance can prove to be problematic for those making just the minimum payment. Generally, card issuers will first apply the minimum payment to lower APR balances before payments made in excess of that go to balances with higher APRs.

Unlike typical credit card interest rates, most cash advances have a flat APR irrespective of the individual cardholder's creditworthiness. High APRs are not the only concern for cardholders who use credit to access cash. Only one card in the survey does not charge a fee for cash advances, which is typically $10 or 5 percent of each advance, whichever is greater.

The one thing cash advance borrowers can't rack up: credit card rewards. Cash advances also cannot be used to directly pay off any card balances or loans held by the same bank.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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The Possibilities of Paint: How to Revamp Your Home’s Exterior

June 19, 2017 2:15 am

If you’re hoping to up your curb appeal or just give your home a face lift, then you may already know that fresh paint is the easiest and most cost-effective route.

"Just add a pinch of a new paint color here and there.  It's a simple recipe to make even the plainest home more interesting," advises Debbie Zimmer, design expert with the Paint Quality Institute.

Below are a handful of tips for upping your home’s ante with a splash or two of color.

Front first. "The first place to consider adding new color is the entranceway," says Zimmer.  "It's usually visible from the street so everyone sees it, and it's also where visitors first come face to face with your home.".

Do the door. For a color pop, choose a color for your front door that contrasts with the rest of the home. Fengshui enthusiasts favor red, while black can be just as bold. Before you choose that soft off-white, remember that dark shades are always more practical for doors since they are better at concealing smudges and fingerprints.

Shutter time. When it comes to accent painting, turn to your shutters. You can paint these the same color as your door, or choose something complimentary of an interesting but balanced look.  

Attention to detail. If you’re home has interesting detailing such as “gingerbread” trim, consider painting it a contrasting or complimentary color as well.   

The furniture, too! Do you have a porch or deck? Tie in your exterior look by painting the furniture to match or accent.  

Source: Paint Quality Institute

 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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